Bin Laden: The Man Who Declared War on America

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  1. Adam's Apple
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    Bin Laden: The Man Who Declared War on America
    By Yossef Bodansky

    I can heartily recommend the above book to those of you who have an interest in Bin Laden and the war on terror. All the material covered is particularly interesting since Clinton’s defense of his pursuit of Bin Laden this past Sunday on “Fox News Sunday”.

    Bodansky, who was director of the Task Force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare, a senior consultant to the DOD and State Department, and has more than 25 years of experience in the terrorism/unconventional warfare field, gives you a good look into terrorist networks and their aims. He tells you the various networks involved, the countries involved, the people involved, and takes you inside their methods of operation. Bin Laden did not become a top leader in this network until 1996although he has been involved in militant Islam from the time of the Russo-Afghan war.

    The “Afghan” (mostly Sunni Arab) warriors who fought the Russians became the nucleus army of the terrorist organizations that sprung up like wildfire after the war and have increased greatly in membership since that time.

    Bodansky’s book begins with the war against the Russians in Afghanistan and covers such topics as the organization of the radical networks, the intensive involvement of Iran in these efforts, how these networks are financed, the goal to convert the African countries to the “cause”, the assault on the U.S. marines in Somalia (where Sunni Arabs from Iraq were involved), Pakistan and the Taliban, the Balkans, the attack on the Khobar Towers, the downing of TWA800 over Scotland, and all the other newsworthy events having to do with terrorist acts in the late l990s.

    The book is a little over 400 pages, so that might turn some people off right away; but Bodansky writes in a story-telling style , so it is easy to read and follow. You might have some trouble keeping all the various terrorist networks and “players” straight because there are many of them.

    I can guarantee you that you will know far more about militant Islam and Bin Laden after reading this book than you do currently.
     

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