Bill O'Reilly Did A Comparison

Discussion in 'Politics' started by WillowTree, Nov 29, 2012.

?

Which State Would You Choose to Live in?

  1. Texas

    72.9%
  2. California

    27.1%
  1. WillowTree
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    WillowTree Diamond Member

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  2. Valerie
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    Valerie Gold Member

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    Hmm it is an interesting contrast...





    ...California, the state with the largest population. Texas is second. And it's fascinating to compare the two places because they signify the clash, the clash that's taking place in America right now.

    Texas voted for Romney by about 1.3 million votes. California voted for Obama by about 2.3 million votes. Texas is a conservative state, California dominated by liberal Americans. Both states have more minority voters than white voters.

    The overriding tradition of Texas is that self-reliance rules. Most voters there don't want government telling them what to do. Therefore, they don't have a lot of social services. No state income tax in Texas. However, debt in the Lone Star State is about $40 billion and there is a balanced budget amendment.

    By contrast California owes an astounding $167 billion. And it's running an annual deficit of about $9 billion, money that can never, never be paid back. And what is California getting for all of that? High school graduation rate; 37th out of 50 states. Per capita income, $44,500. But there is a 10.1 percent unemployment rate. Crime number one, there are more prisoners in California than any other state.

    Let's take a look at Texas high school graduation rate ranks 44th slightly above California. Per capita income about $40,000 bucks per year. But there is relatively low unemployment 6.6 percent. Convicts in state prisons ranked number two behind California.

    So you can see there is not a big difference in the economic and social stats but there is a big difference in mind set. California has many more social welfare programs. Golden State also has many more business regulations.

    Texas, you could pretty much set up any "bigness" you want. You can also ride a motorcycle without a helmet. Talk on the cell phone in a car and on and on. Texans basically saying hey, government, get out of our lives!

    The Californians on the other hand generally embrace big government in just about all areas. I mean when the city council of San Francisco proposes to ban gold fish, you know you have intrusive situation. By the way that same city council finally banned public nudity last week except for permitted festivals or parades. Thank God the Thanksgiving Day parade, not held in the city by the bay.

    In Texas, if you run around naked and make a wrong move, you might get shot. The state allows its citizens to carry concealed weapons. You can't do that if you are naked.


    ...
     
  3. AmyNation
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    AmyNation Road Warrior Supporting Member

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    Neither.
     
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  4. FJO
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    FJO Gold Member

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    Like Dennis Miller said (I paraphrase) for topological reasons, I would like living in California, but for social reason I would choose Texas.
     
  5. squinch
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    squinch Active Member

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  6. tjvh
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    tjvh Senior Member

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    Aren't as many earthquakes or liberals in Texas. Texas +1.
     
  7. Some Guy
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    Some Guy Deregulated User

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    Considering the similar high school graduation rates, crime rates, etc, it seems like the determining factor for those might be population rather than political ideology.
     
  8. AmyNation
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    AmyNation Road Warrior Supporting Member

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    Wasn't Texas recently ranked worst healthcare in the nation?

    Both Cal. and Texas have pretty serious problems, neither state is in the top best states to live in.
     
  9. Valerie
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    Valerie Gold Member

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    :lol: Never gonna happen... IMO





    [​IMG]


    A petition calling for secession that was filed by a Texas man on a White House Web site has received tens of thousands of signatures, and the Obama administration must now issue a response. And Larry Scott Kilgore, a perennial Republican candidate from Arlington, a Dallas suburb, announced that he was running for governor in 2014 and would legally change his name to Larry Secede Kilgore, with Secede in capital letters. As his Web page, secedekilgore.com, puts it: “Secession! All other issues can be dealt with later.”

    In Texas, talk of secession in recent years has steadily shifted to the center from the fringe right. It has emerged as an echo of the state Republican leadership’s anti-Washington, pro-Texas-sovereignty mantra on a variety of issues, including health care and environmental regulations. For some Texans, the renewed interest in the subject serves simply as comic relief after a crushing election defeat.

    But for other proponents of secession and its sister ideology, Texas nationalism — a focus of the Texas Nationalist Movement and other groups that want the state to become an independent nation, as it was in the 1830s and 1840s — it is a far more serious matter.

    The official in East Texas, Peter Morrison, the treasurer of the Hardin County Republican Party, said in a statement that he had received overwhelming support from conservative Texans and overwhelming opposition from liberals outside the state in response to his comments in his newsletter. He said that it may take time for “people to appreciate that the fundamental cultural differences between Texas and other parts of the United States may be best addressed by an amicable divorce, a peaceful separation.”

    The online petitions — created on the We the People platform at petitions.whitehouse.gov — are required to receive 25,000 signatures in 30 days for the White House to respond. The Texas petition, created Nov. 9 by a man identified as Micah H. of Arlington, had received more than 116,000 signatures by Friday. It asks the Obama administration to “peacefully grant” the withdrawal of Texas, and describes doing so as “practically feasible,” given the state’s large economy.

    Residents in other states, including Alabama, Florida, Colorado, Louisiana and Oklahoma, have submitted similar petitions, though none have received as many signatures as the one from Texas.

    A White House official said every petition that crossed the signature threshold would be reviewed and would receive a response, though it was unclear precisely when Micah H. would receive his answer.

    Gov. Rick Perry, who twice made public remarks in 2009 suggesting that he was sympathetic to the secessionist cause, will not be signing the petition. “Governor Perry believes in the greatness of our union, and nothing should be done to change it,” a spokeswoman, Catherine Frazier, said in a statement. “But he also shares the frustrations many Americans have with our federal government.”

    The secession movement in Texas is divergent, with differences in goals and tactics.


    With Stickers, a Petition and Even a Middle Name, Secession Fever Hits Texas - NYTimes.com
     
  10. Mr Clean
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    Mr Clean Gold Member

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    Most of Texas is a flat, barren hell hole full of loud mouthed ignorant assholes.

    I'd take CA over TX in a heartbeat.
     
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