Betelguese's bizarre dimming has astronomers scratching their heads

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Dalia, Jan 14, 2020 at 7:32 AM.

  1. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    I read an article it is might be about to go super nova.
    We can only hope,


    A supernova that big, that close.....could be seriously bad for us.
     
  2. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    Not according to two articles I read, the blast area is well-well-well out of range, we should have no effects at all save for a serious light show.
    In fact at 640 light years away it could have already happened in the 15 century and we wouldn't know it yet.
     
  3. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    A near-Earth supernova is an explosion resulting from the death of a star that occurs close enough to the Earth (roughly less than 10 to 300 parsecs (30 to 1000 light-years) away[2]) to have noticeable effects on Earth's biosphere.

    Historically, each near-Earth supernova explosion has been associated with a global warming of around 3–4 °C (5–7 °F). An estimated 20 supernova explosions have happened within 300 pc of the Earth over the last 11 million years. Type II supernova explosions are expected to occur in active star-forming regions, with 12 such OB associations being located within 650 pc of the Earth. At present, there are six near-Earth supernova candidates within 300 pc.[3]

    Near-Earth supernova - Wikipedia
     
  4. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    AHAAAA!!!!.... that explains global warming!!
     
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  5. Fort Fun Indiana
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    Fort Fun Indiana Platinum Member

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    From what I have read, there is no danger to life or even any danger of any appreciable warming from a Betelgeuse supernova

    The extreme ranges given in the excerpt posted above may apply, but Betelgeuse is nowhere near in size to the most massive stars in the universe. It will be just a bit brighter than the full moon, at supernova. Do you feel the warmth of a full moon, at night? Nope...
     
  6. there4eyeM
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    there4eyeM unlicensed metaphysician

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    It is just a passing intergalactic vessel plugged in for recharging.
     
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  7. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    I sincerely hope it began it's supernove some 600 years ago, then we would be able to see it. All we will see is a very bright star for a few weeks...but imagine how light it will be out if it happens within a full moon. It will be like dusk in the middle of the night.
     
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  8. james bond
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    james bond Silver Member

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    As usual, you're wrong. Global dimming.
     

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