Been A Bit Busy

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Annie, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Hi All. It's one of the zionist mods, checking in to let 'those concerned' have a bit of a glimpse of what has been eating into my time. I've been in training to ready my classes on a civics program.

    In the course of that, I got volunteered to work on the Illinois part of this project Sandra Day O'Conner will be affiliated with:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/24/AR2006032401621.html

    More here:

    http://www.civiced.org/campaign_intro.php
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Here is a snippet that's related:

    http://www.city-journal.org/html/16_1_higher_education.html

    Note that the writer is referencing mostly ' privileged students'...

     
  3. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Not accusing YOU, Kathianne, but I think part of the problem is WHICH VERSION of history & current events is being imparted to the kids.
     
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  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Actually, in this case we are speaking of basic civics. Sad to say that this is unusal today. This program however is first rate and has been funded by an act of Congress. It's important and if you have children that are in school; public, private or homeschooled; you should be fighting for the inclusion of these classes. Your school can get one set minimum at each level free (30 copies + teacher's edition); training and support for staff. If you homeschool, you may also qualify.

    From Middle School/High School, (lower elementary (5 units) omits federalist/anti-federalist arguments, though good readers in 4th or 5th grade could use middle school text):

    Unit 1. What is government? State of nature; republicanism; constitutional goverment Btw, 'constitutional government' is defined as the establishment of a government limited in powers, committed to the rule of law.

    Unit 2. What experiences shaped the Founders' thinking about goverment? government philosophies from Greece to Rome to England and France; The colonial experience; French and Indian War; Magna Carta through Virginia Constitition; civic virtue

    Unit 3. What happened at the Philadelphia Convention? Articles of Confederation and their impact on the Revolutionary War; Who attended and their backgrounds; their shared ideas of government; their differences articulated by Federalist/Anti-Federalist publications; Which branch could they trust most? Least? How is that evidenced?

    Unit 4. How was the Constitution used to establish our government? Federalism; ratification; political parties; judicial review including 'Has the Supreme Court personified the fears of the Anti-Fedalists? (there is no 'answer' just questions and case law to look at).

    Unit 5. How does the Constitution Protect our basic rights? Bill of Rights; the ongoing extension of francise; Equal protection; due process

    Unit 6. What are the responsibilites of citizens? civic virtue; your ideas count, you legislators will respond to you; how to weigh issues; voting

    There is no stretching to find diversity examples. There is no mention of the Native Americans, other than their helpfulness early on. (Trust me, it's not that the profs writing this are unaware of the Trail of Tears, rather they are not being diverted by pc at this point in time. Several have written texts on such blights on American experience, but the discussion of Constitution is not the time for that. Try telling that to Prentice-Hall and other major publishers).

    The 3/5ths clause is dealt with as a clause, nothing more or less. There are questions asked that will lead the 'brighter' kids to get the connection of while ignored, the seeds of 1860 were sown here and before. Since it is dealt with in the discussion of 'compromise for ratification' the students are given a hard choice the Framer's faced. More than that, it's acknowledge not to be a compromise, as even this early trying to strike a compromise would have led to failure of ratification.

    Nearly all USMB members are well versed in all of these topics. Perhaps you would be shocked that it's unusual now for kids to be taught these things? It is. It was testing done in 1998, that measured how 10th-11th grade students taught civics, in an unadulturated format knew more than college freshmen and sophomores at highly selective universities, had a better understanding of rights and responsibilities:

    http://www.civiced.org/research_validation.html

    What I find exciting about this, which I teach before the Constitution, is that the kids have a chance to develop an appreciation for the contributions and heroics of people like Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Cincinnatus, Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Adams, etc.

    It doesn't bash or provide cherry tree stories. It tells their stories, through deeds and writings. Powerful stuff.
     

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