Bailout marks Karl Marx's comeback

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Skull Pilot, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. Skull Pilot
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    Skull Pilot Platinum Member

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    Bailout marks Karl Marx's comeback - FP Comment

    In his Communist Manifesto, published in 1848, Karl Marx proposed 10 measures to be implemented after the proletariat takes power, with the aim of centralizing all instruments of production in the hands of the state. Proposal Number Five was to bring about the “centralization of credit in the banks of the state, by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive monopoly.”

    If he were to rise from the dead today, Marx might be delighted to discover that most economists and financial commentators, including many who claim to favour the free market, agree with him.

    Indeed, analysts at the Heritage and Cato Institute, and commentators in The Wall Street Journal and on this very page, have made declarations in favour of the massive “injection of liquidities” engineered by central banks in recent months, the government takeover of giant financial institutions, as well as the still stalled US$700-billion bailout package. Some of the same voices were calling for similar interventions following the burst of the dot-com bubble in 2001.

    “Whatever happened to the modern followers of my free-market opponents?” Marx would likely wonder.
    At first glance, anyone who understands economics can see that there is something wrong with this picture. The taxes that will need to be levied to finance this package may keep some firms alive, but they will siphon off capital, kill jobs and make businesses less productive elsewhere. Increasing the money supply is no different. It is an invisible tax that redistributes resources to debtors and those who made unwise investments.

    So why throw this sound free-market analysis overboard as soon as there is some downturn in the markets?
    The rationale for intervening always seems to centre on the fear of reliving the Great Depression. If we let too many institutions fail because of insolvency, we are being told, there is a risk of a general collapse of financial markets, with the subsequent drying up of credit and the catastrophic effects this would have on all sectors of production. This opinion, shared by Ben Bernanke, Henry Paulson and most of the right-wing political and financial establishments, is based on Milton Friedman’s thesis that the Fed aggravated the Depression by not pumping enough money into the financial system following the market crash of 1929.

    It sounds libertarian enough. The misguided policies of the Fed, a government creature, and bad government regulation are held responsible for the crisis. The need to respond to this emergency and keep markets running overrides concerns about taxing and inflating the money supply. This is supposed to contrast with the left-wing Keynesian approach, whose solutions are strangely very similar despite a different view of the causes.

    But there is another approach that doesn’t compromise with free-market principles and coherently explains why we constantly get into these bubble situations followed by a crash. It is centered on Marx’s Proposal Number Five: government control of capital.

    For decades, Austrian School economists have warned against the dire consequences of having a central banking system based on fiat money, money that is not grounded on any commodity like gold and can easily be manipulated. In addition to its obvious disadvantages (price inflation, debasement of the currency, etc.), easy credit and artificially low interest rates send wrong signals to investors and exacerbate business cycles.

    Not only is the central bank constantly creating money out of thin air, but the fractional reserve system allows financial institutions to increase credit many times over. When money creation is sustained, a financial bubble begins to feed on itself, higher prices allowing the owners of inflated titles to spend and borrow more, leading to more credit creation and to even higher prices.

    As prices get distorted, malinvestments, or investments that should not have been made under normal market conditions, accumulate. Despite this, financial institutions have an incentive to join this frenzy of irresponsible lending, or else they will lose market shares to competitors. With “liquidities” in overabundance, more and more risky decisions are made to increase yields and leveraging reaches dangerous levels.

    During that manic phase, everybody seems to believe that the boom will go on. Only the Austrians warn that it cannot last forever, as Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises did before the 1929 crash, and as their followers have done for the past several years.

    Now, what should be done when that pyramidal scheme starts crashing to the floor, because of a series of cascading failures or concern from the central bank that inflation is getting out of control? It’s obvious that credit will shrink, because everyone will want to get out of risky businesses, to call back loans and to put their money in safe places. Malinvestments have to be liquidated; prices have to come down to realistic levels; and resources stuck in unproductive uses have to be freed and moved to sectors that have real demand. Only then will capital again become available for productive investments.
    Friedmanites, who have no conception of malinvestments and never raise any issue with the boom, also cannot understand why it inevitably leads to a crash. They only see the drying up of credit and blame the Fed for not injecting massive enough amounts of liquidities to prevent it.

    But central banks and governments cannot transform unprofitable investments into profitable ones. They cannot force institutions to increase lending when they are so exposed. This is why calls for throwing more money at the problem are so totally misguided. Injections of liquidities started more than a year ago and have had no effect in preventing the situation from getting worse. Such measures can only delay the market correction and turn what should be a quick recession into a prolonged one.

    Friedman — who, contrary to popular perception, was not a foe of monetary inflation, but simply wanted to keep it under better control in normal circumstances — was wrong about the Fed not intervening during the Depression. It tried repeatedly to inflate but credit still went down for various reasons. This is a key difference in interpretation between the Austrian and Chicago schools.

    As Friedrich Hayek wrote in 1932, “Instead of furthering the inevitable liquidation of the maladjustments brought about by the boom during the last three years, all conceivable means have been used to prevent that readjustment from taking place; and one of these means, which has been repeatedly tried though without success, from the earliest to the most recent stages of depression, has been this deliberate policy of credit expansion. ... To combat the depression by a forced credit expansion is to attempt to cure the evil by the very means which brought it about ...”

    The confusion of Chicago school economics on monetary issues is so profound as to lead its adherents today to support the largest government grab of private capital in world history. By adding their voices to those on the left, these confused free-marketeers are not helping to “save capitalism”, but contributing to its destruction.


    Food for thought??
     
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    Last edited: Sep 30, 2008
  2. eots
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    eots no fly list

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    Obama is channeling the great Marx spirit..this is why he is destine to be our great leader..to leads us into a era of tremendous change and challenge a time of.. big ideas ..a new world order....someone to leads us and someone to follow...resitence is futile... praise him
     
  3. Skull Pilot
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    YES! Another Trekkie on the board!
     
  4. Skull Pilot
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    Here's another way of looking at this. Bring Down That Chandelier! - Mises Economics Blog

    Ohhh Henry
    Fed Pumps Further $630 Billion Into Financial System

    I will try to explain this important news story for you now.

    Imagine Crusoe and Friday living on an island. Crusoe picks apples and Friday catches fish all day. Every day Crusoe trades 5 of his apples for 2 fish from Friday. Sometimes Crusoe takes a day off, to rest or to fix his ladder, and on those days he gives Friday a banana leaf with "IOU 10 apples" (5 apples principal and 5 apples interest) written on it, receiving his usual fish . The next day he picks more apples than usual and gives Friday 15 apples in exchange for the IOU and 2 more fish. The IOU is destroyed by wrapping it around the fish and baking them over hot coals. That day Friday eats 10 apples, having gone without the day before, and saves the extra 5 apples to eat sometime in the future when he plans to take a day off to mend his nets.

    Then Crusoe takes a month off in order to build himself a big new sleeping hut with bamboo plumbing and a mahogany tiki bar. Afterward he's way behind in his apple collecting, and he realizes he's going to have to work extra hard in the next several months to pay back all the IOUs he gave out. He's a bit worried because he used the wood from his ladder to build a deck and he's nor sure he can meet his obligations. Friday doesn't seem very interested in exchanging huts with him in order to wipe out the debt.

    But Crusoe's pet monkey Theodore (whom he humorously refers to as "The Ted") decides to help Crusoe by giving him 630 billion crisp, new banana leaves with "IOU 10 apples" written on them. Walking around with a bailing can full of these IOUs makes Crusoe feel like he is on top of the world. "Look", he says, "I got a bailout. Stability has returned!" He starts planning an even larger addition to his hut.

    Of course there are not even this many apples on the island, and even if there were Crusoe couldn't pick that many in the rest of his life.

    Crusoe's buddy Friday, who has continued fishing as normal, starts to question the value of the IOUs and starts demanding twice as many of the banana leaves with "10 apples" written on them for the same amount of fish. The Ted tries to make everyone happy by printing "IOU" on another 500 trillion banana leaves and passing them to Crusoe as an emergency measure, agreed upon unanimously in a special late-night conference between Crusoe, The Ted, and Crusoe's pet parrot. Shortly afterward Friday refuses to take any more banana leaves, Crusoe has to give Friday his house and his apple orchard, and then he has to either work for Friday picking apples all day and mending fishing nets at night, or starve.


    Published: September 29, 2008 5:09 PM
     
  5. gonegolfin
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    Spot on, Skull Pilot.

    Brian


     

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