Backpack trip into wilderness

Discussion in 'Travel' started by yiostheoy, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. cnm
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    cnm Diamond Member

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    Sika and fallow are the best eating deer I've experienced, much better than red.
     
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  2. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    To be honest with you the climb is easy, and the crowds annoying. Far better, at least IMHO, was the hike up Waucoba Mountain on the opposite side of Owens Valley. It's only a bit more than 11K to the top, but there's NO ONE there.
     
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  3. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    I normally prefer rolling mountain country with abundant water from mountain springs and streams.

    Summits are generally not preferable because there is never any water up there so you need to bring your own.

    I hate dry camps.

    I usually plan excursions from one water source to the next one.

    Water is great for drinking, for cooking, for cleaning up, and for washing your clothes out.
     
  4. Treeshepherd
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    Treeshepherd Grandidierite Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    65 pound packs, canned drinks, percolators, multiple fire arms, daily laundry, two person tents, poop bags...
    I'm definitely not interested in carrying all that over 2 passes per day. The people I met on the PCT this month don't travel like that. They typically resupply food once a week and keep the pack around 40 pounds or less.
     
  5. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    I can do 55 lbs max. But only on flat lands.

    40 lbs is my ideal including 5 pints of water.
     
  6. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Yeah 65 was a bit much but it was a long time ago, before the technology lightened everything up.
     
  7. Treeshepherd
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    Treeshepherd Grandidierite Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    My sleeping bag (2lbs.), obviously, I forgot to list that. And ENO makes an insulating blanket that fits inside the hammock and wraps around the bag. That's mere ounces.

    I would take a tent if I did Oregon and Washington. In California you can eek by without one in August. Weather comes in in the afternoon, typically, but clears out at dusk (in my experience). Tents are mostly a type of psychological security. They also provide privacy for intimate couples. But I like to look at the stars and I was plenty warm in my 22 degree bag above 10,000 feet earlier this month.

    My next leg of the PCT from Donner heading north won't be as high. Maybe 8,000 feet max. Not sure if it'll be blazing hot or rainy and cool. Looking forward to hot springs around Lassen.

    Anyway, happy trails all. My trail name is Squirrel. See you out there.
     
  8. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    The national parks and state parks do not allow firearms. Thus if you hike through one of them you may not have any. Whenever I cannot carry a firearm I always have my machete with me, shoulder mounted on its own belt across my shoulder.

    The national forests and BLM land permit guns, but you need to have a valid hunting license for hunting. Best to have a bear tag also in case you need to shoot one. And a pig tag as well. Deer season is carefully controlled and regulated, besides which you are unlikely to see a hunt-able buck anyway because the mountain lions are killing most of them.

    If you get dropped off early enough in the day so that you can start hiking-in right away, then you don't need to set up a trailhead camp with a percolating coffee maker, canned drinks, pots and pans for a real breakfast. But for us each to get to Whitney Portal campground we each had to drive 8 or more hours by car. So we set up a camp and had a nice breakfast in the morning of the first day.

    Since bear canisters are mandatory as well as make sense, just a tiny backpacking detergent vial lets you wash your skivis, sox, sock liners, and shirt when needed. This way you are always wearing clean dry clothing next to your skin. And then you don't need to carry as much extra clothing -- just one day's worth. You already have the bear canister so it might as well get full usage.

    I like the idea of packing out poop. Squatting all over the wilderness seems nasty now to me.

    In the rain and sleet (tiny hail), a ground tarp and tent and rain fly are indispensable. Otherwise you could suffer hypothermia. Our tents each worked well in the 3 days of rain that we encountered.

    Each trip is different. Desert is different than mountains. Bear country is different than coyote country. Mountain lions are almost everywhere in California. So a tent is a good thing in most cases anywhere. Tents protect you from parasite insects like ticks, fleas, mosquitoes, and biting flies (kissing bugs) as well. Fleas carry plague bacillus. Mice and rats carry fleas. There are plague warnings all over the Sierra.
     
  9. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    Rule #1 for backpacking is "pack it in -- pack it out."

    Unfortunately most people squat in the woods and don't pack it out.

    We pick up after our dogs in town.

    So there is no good reason not to pick up after ourselves as well.

    Leave the forest as you found it -- pristine.
     
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  10. yiostheoy
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    yiostheoy Gold Member

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    Just finished cleaning up all my gear and doing the laundry and dishes from the trip.

    After I took all my gear out of the backpack, I cleaned it and returned it to the back pack. Except for replenishing the dehydrated meals, of which I need more Mountain House dehydrates for my 3 day supply, my pack is always packed and ready to go. It is my 72 hour kit when I am not backpacking with it.

    Now I need to run to the store for groceries. Before I leave home for a week I tend to eat everything out of the fridge so that it is empty and nothing can spoil while I am away. Net result, the fridge is completely empty now.

    Grocery shopping tends to require getting one or two of everything at this point.

    On the trail the dehydrated scrambled eggs and bacon were very good, so now I am hungry for fresh scrambled eggs with fresh bacon in the mornings -- so I'll buy some of that.

    I missed bread and also tuna mayo sandwiches. So I'll get more of that for lunches. Tuna and mayo on toast tastes great for lunch.

    I got plenty of dehydrated beef and vegies on the trail, so now I will get a corned beef brisket and cook that tonight, with cabbage and carrots. You really miss fresh foods on a backpack trip, although the dehydrates tend to taste pretty good while you are out there since you are hungrier outdoors.

    I missed milk. I especially missed strawberry milkshakes, which I make by blending together frozen strawberries with milk in my blender. So I'll get both. These are my main cravings from civilization. I did not miss alcoholic drinks, but I did miss strawberry milkshakes.

    I have plenty of booze, so I don't need more of that. My booze of choice is Everclear, which I mix with frozen fruit and make fruit smoothies with. But I have plenty of booze, just need more strawberries, same as for the milk shakes.

    I missed fresh vegetables so I will get more of those. Stir fry vegies are my favorites, even though I don't always stir fry them.

    For me, returning to civilization is an exercise in gratification of all the food lusts that I missed out on the backpack trail. This is where Epicureanism (my primary philosophy) takes over from Stoicism (my secondary backup philosophy) again.

    Epicureanism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Stoicism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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