Anybody get the new Beatles set?

Discussion in 'Music' started by elvis, Sep 9, 2009.

  1. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    I have all their "original" CD's. Not sure if i should fork out $250 for remastering.
     
  2. Fatality
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    Fatality SunCrackedSoul

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    listen to someone elses first to see if there is any difference.
     
  3. Midnight Marauder
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    Midnight Marauder BANNED

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    The entire Beatles catalog was digitally remastered from the original session tapes, at Abbey Road studios by Paul Hicks, son of the Hollies' Tony Hicks; 40-year-old Guy Massey; and Giles Martin, 39, son of legendary Beatles producer George Martin.

    The difference in quality between these new releases and what's been previously out there is night and day. Get the Beatles "Love" CD first, for a hint of the difference, Giles Martin worked with his dad George on that, did remasters for that from original session tapes as well, for the Cirque De Solei Vegas show of the same name.

    Yeah, hold off on the purchase though. That $250 price tag will be cut in half or more in less than a year.

    Here's a snippet from Variety:

    For the new catalog remasters, the team employed modern technology to revamp the catalog. When originally converted to the CD format, Massey notes, the catalog was more or less transferred "flat," with little equalization adjustment. "Digital was in its infancy in the mid-'80s," he says. "In the 20 years since, digital technology has come forward in leaps and bounds."

    The new "archive" transfers offer a powerful new listening experience as they contain more sonic content, transferred at 192 Mhz/24 bit -- all of which has always been present on the original masters, though unavailable for fans to hear due to the limitations of the earlier technology.

    The team also used technology such as Cedar Audio's Cambridge restoration software to carefully remove flaws such as mic pops, hum and harsh edits -- anything non-Beatle-related -- on the recordings, while leaving in original quirks like squeaks from Ringo's bass drum pedal on 1963's "All I've Got to Do."
     

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