Any physicists?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Gurdari, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. Gurdari
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    Gurdari Egaliterra

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    What is a 'singularity'? A point of infinite density?
    How can a single photon of light pass through two holes?

    (Dr. Gurdari takes aspirin, logs out)
     
  2. Vintij
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    Vintij Senior Member

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    A singularity is a combination of 4 forces. Electromagnetism, Gravity, weak nuclear power and strong nuclear power. All of these govern the universe. The singularity in theory, was as small as an atom, infinitely dense. The energy in it was all of the energy in the entire universe compacted into this tiny spot. It became unstable and collapsed upon itself creating the big bang, after that, the singularity was split into these 4 forces. Photons spawned a few billion years after, which created light. Before that nothing could be seen, not even the singularity. Ofcourse the only person who could have created this singularity would be GOD or someone outside of the physical universe.

    Second question

    Its called quantum photon entanglement.

    At high energys, photons or (quantum particles) split. If you send a photon down a higly energized optic, with the end that looks like this Y the photon would split and go down both paths. This is exremely high energy though, and the optic would have to be at least 7 miles long. These photons are entangled, which means technically they are one photon, what happens to one, happens to the other, but with the high energy optic, they can be split.
     
  3. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    A month and a half and no disputes.


    So much for the fuckin' geniouses.
     
  4. Psychoblues
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    Psychoblues Senior Member

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    Yep.



    So much for that argument.
     
  5. SpidermanTuba
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    SpidermanTuba BANNED

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    Answer to the first question:

    If f(x) is not defined at a particular point x = x0, then a singularity is said to exist at x0.

    For instance, in the function f(x) = 1 / (x - 1), there is a singularity at x = 1.

    A singularity in space is one where the density goes to infinity. A blackhole has a singularity, and the big bang had one. But the the term "singularity" is a very general one and is actually mostly used to refer simply to points in a function that are not defined.


    Question 2:

    A single photon of light can pass through two holes because a single photon of light behaves as a wave.
     
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  6. Vintij
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    Vintij Senior Member

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    I think he was referring to a gravitational singularity, specifically the big bang. I dont think he cares about technological singularity's or the arithmetic behind singularity's.

    As for light, well entanglement is another way of saying light waves that cancel eachother out or amplify eachother.

    I dont think its proper to just say that light can pass through two holes because it travels in waves. It should be explained a little better by using quantum entanglment or particle physics.
     
  7. SpidermanTuba
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    SpidermanTuba BANNED

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    Yeah, but gravitational singularities are just special cases of singularities. Most of the time when I hear the term "singularity" used in physics, its referring to a singularity in an equation.
     
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