Anti-Mubarak Forces in Egypt Need Wise Leaders!

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by JimofPennsylvan, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. JimofPennsylvan
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    JimofPennsylvan VIP Member

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    People of good will throughout the world share the Egyptian people's happiness with Hosni Mubarak's representation that he wouldn't seek reelection in this September elections. Nevertheless, people throughout the world watch the current violence unfolding in Egypt several people being killed and six hundred plus hurt with great sadness!

    Watching the events unfold in Egypt in Tahrir Square, it makes one think there has to be a better way for the people of Egypt to obtain their freedom. Wisdom seems to call for the following assessments about Egypt. The public of Egypt for now should conclude they achieved a great success with Mubarak's announcement this is his last term. The anti-Mubarak protestors should now back down, don't physically confront the proMubarak protestors the price is too high with that course in terms of physical harm. We know the Egyptian people want Mubarak to leave immediately because he was an oppressive dictator who left his country impoverished and they want to be done with the badness he brings on the country, but he has chosen not to leave and resorting to violence does not show a clear path to success.



    Anti-Mubarak leaders have to stop calling Egyptian people to continue to protest until Mubarak steps down, this calling Egyptians to patriotism, to be idealistic to follow all the good feelings that will be realized by protesting is foolishness. Anti-Mubarak leaders need to be calling people to act with wisdom and back down from physical confrontation now, go back to your communities and work to support good political leaders that will run for the presidency in the upcoming elections. Anti-Mubarak leaders need to be calling the Egyptian people to act with wisdom and what is really wise and important is not that Mubarak leave immediately rather that the upcoming elections are fair, that in the remaining months of his tenure Mubarak and his allies don't loot the country so the Anti-Mubarak public should work through the legal system to insure that such doesn't take place I am sure that with Mubarak's short tenure there will be some Egyptian judges that will have the virtue to stop the looting. To insure the elections are fair the Anti-Mubarak leaders should lobby the international community to send international election watchdog groups to monitor the elections to make sure their fair, I am sure the U.S. government would be receptive to such lobbying and with US foreign aid dollars they obviously have significant leverage to bring this about. What is wise is that Anti-Mubarak leaders work to stop Mubarak's parliament from enacting bad legislation in their waning months, again, work through the courts to have the current parliament found to be illegitimate due to the fact that the elections which put them into office were unfair.

    Anti-Mubarak leaders instead of trying to use direct physical confrontation to get Mubarak to step down be wise and use the force of the ensuing political campaign to achieve that end. Good Egyptian candidates should be campaigning how they are going to move Egypt forward not spend their term in office seeking revenge against government officials but they should be representing that the top government officials responsible for the political crimes that transpired over the last thirty years will be brought to justice as a deterrent against future leaders committing like political crimes (the same development that occurred in Iraq along these lines should happen in Egypt), the bottom line is Mubarak and his Vice President the head of the Egyptian Intelligence services should hang from a rope for the blood on their hands. If Mubarak has any sense at all he will be making arrangements as quickly as he can to leave Egypt seeking permanent asylum in a foreign country to escape Egypt's criminal justice system. Anti-Mubarak leaders spare your peoples' blood call them to back down now and go home to their communities and be patient freedom and goodness will come to Egypt it will just take time to work out the path!
     
  2. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Now dey goin' after his cronies...
    :cool:
    Mubarak’s former top officials appear in court
    Fri, Feb 25, 2011 - An angry crowd of hundreds taunted three former high-ranking members of ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak’s regime as they arrived in court for a corruption hearing on Wednesday.
    See also:

    Why some Egyptians wish their revolution had never happened
    February 24, 2011 - Umm Karim, a mother of four, can only afford one meal per day. Her teenage sons both lost their jobs when the factory they worked in burned down in Egypt's revolution.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011
  3. jckryan
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    jckryan So, this is purgatory?

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    This goes for all the countries going through this.

    Unfortunately in the past, when a leader replaces the old guard promising democracy . . they have been turning into dictators that have at least a 25 year stranglehold on the country.

    This goes for all the countries going through this.

    Ever seen the "Untouchables"?

    If the department is dirty, you go to the academy.

    Get a college/western educated candidate that has a Master's w/experince in Political Science and Economics with a minor in Public Relations. Maybe throw in some past military experience.

    But don't put somebody who has a questionable past/affiliations, that makes all these promises to their country and the West.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/15/world/asia/15afghan.html

    Kabul Bank employees flee to Pakistan amid investigation into lending, officials say

    Got to learn from the past. Will we ever?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  4. docmauser1
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    docmauser1 Gold Member

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    Nevah, of course. Egypt, as we know, has just got a Khomeini of its own.
     
  5. hipeter924
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    hipeter924 Not a zombie yet

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    Democracy isn't what its cracked up to be (especially in poorer countries), just look at India or Indonesia, which both have epidemic corruption, high levels of poverty, and a wealthy elite that hold the power and wealth and keep people in poverty. Who knows Egypt might have a military dictator in a few months anyway, especially since it appears Egyptian revolutionaries have no plan, unless they plan to hang a few people and start a Napoleonic war.:eusa_eh:
     

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