Annie Oakley

Discussion in 'History' started by Dalia, May 19, 2017.

  1. Dalia
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    Dalia Platinum Member

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    Annie Oakley (North Star, Darke County, Ohio, August 13, 1860 - Greenville, November 3, 1926) born Phoebe Ann Moses, was one of the legendary women of the American West, famous for its formidable shooting accuracy.

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    Born on the Ohio border, Annie is the fifth in a family of seven children. She begins to hunt at the age of nine to feed her half-brothers and her widowed mother (her father dies in 1866 from pneumonia). She is quickly recognized as an outstanding printer.
    At the age of 16, she left for Cincinnati to participate in a shooting competition with Frank E. Butler (1850-1926), a renowned shooter who performs in shows and who is used to To compete with local shooters. After winning with a no-fault (25 out of 25 against 24 for Butler), she married him on 23 August 1876 and became his assistant for his itinerant show.

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    In 1885, she and her husband joined the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show where she was nicknamed "the safe shooting woman", a nickname she owed to Sitting Bull (she was just over 1.50 m). Her husband then disappears before the talent of his lady and becomes the manager. His talent of fine trigger draws the crowds as the accumulation of his exploits: at 28 meters distance, it touches 4472 of the 5000 glass balls launched into the air. At the same distance, she cuts a card to play in two by her finest side. One of his most famous shots remains the one who could remove the ashes of a cigarette from her husband's mouth. During a tour in Europe, she experimented with his precision in this field with the kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, but taking care that he holds the cigarette in his hand.
    In 1901 she was seriously injured in a train accident, which required five heavy operations, but she recovered amazingly well and resumed her career. Although she moves less towards the end of her life, she does not lose her abilities in shooting: at 62 years, she still touches 100 clay targets in a row at nearly 15 meters away.

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  2. whitehall
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    whitehall Platinum Member

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    "Little Miss Sure Shot" was recruited by Buffalo Bill to be a side show attraction at a time when the shooting sports were popular. Today she might have been a member of the NRA and vilified by the left.
     
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  3. Dalia
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    Hello Whitehall

    Annie was even better shooter than the popular

    Calamity Jane, with her real name Martha Canary, Birth of Calamity Jane in1852,

    Was an adventurer during the conquest of the West, renowned for her ability to track Amerindians, kill game and shoot a gun.

    In 1865, the family emigrated to Montana. She was then 13 years old and during the five-month journey she went hunting with the men. Arriving at his destination, his mother (Charlotte Canary) died there a year later. The same year, the family moved to Salt Lake City, Utah, where his father died in 1868.


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    Then began his hectic lonely life. She joined General Custer two years later as a Scout. She campaigned in Arizona against the Indians. It was at this time that she began to wear men's clothes. She carried out dangerous missions, participated in several campaigns and became very skilled in shooting.
    One day the detachment fell into an ambush. The captain was wounded. Martha turned and saw that the officer was about to fall from his horse. She galloped towards him and caught him before he fell to the ground. She hoisted him on her horse before her, and brought him back to the fort, saving her life. Once cured, the captain said jokingly, "I baptize you Calamity Jane, the heroine of the plains. This nickname would never have left her.

    She began to wear men's clothes. She performs dangerous missions, participates in several campaigns and becomes very skilled in shooting. According to her memoirs, it was during her Scout period that she earned the nickname of Calamity Jane. Engaged by General George Crook, he was ordered to leave with a detachment in Wyoming. Several days later, the group of soldiers underwent several Amerindian skirmishes, during which six soldiers were killed and many others seriously injured. On his way back to the fort, only a few miles from it, the detachment fell into an ambush. The captain is wounded. Turning around, Martha noticed that the officer was going to fall from his horse. She then gallops to him and catches him before he falls. She hoists him on his horse before her, and brings him back to the fort, saving her life. Once cured, the captain said jokingly, "I baptize you Calamity Jane, the heroine of the plains. ". This nickname would never have left her
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    During her campaigns, she is the first white woman to enter the Black Hills, then controlled by the Sioux, which are the sacred mountains. In 1875, it is part of the geological expedition led by Professor Walter Jenney, Expedition of the Black Hills, it is on this occasion that appeared in the press Calamity Jane. She then joined General Custer at Little Big Horn. During her journey, she is forced to swim across the Platte River, after which she falls ill. She is repatriated to Fort Fetterman, where she stays fourteen days. Then, recovering, she set out for Fort Laramie. There she meets Wild Bill Hickok. She traveled with him to Deadwood. Then she is the liaison, as a courier, between Custer, again in the Black Hills, and Deadwood. One day in August 1876, his friend Wild Bill Hickok was killed with a bullet behind his head in a Deadwood "saloon". Although Calamity Jane is admitted to an adventure with Calamity Jane, it would seem that they were in fact only very good friends, nothing more, and that the father of his child (Janey) A lieutenant with whom she would have had a liaison for some time.
    She would then go in search of the murderer, one named Jack McCall, and grab him to hand him over to justice. But this one would have escaped. It was resumed some time later, tried and then hanged.
    She left Deadwood in 1877 with the seventh cavalry. The following year, she did some prospecting. Then she makes shuttles between different forts and cities, conveying a team of oxen, the most resistant animals for this kind of journeys in this region precisely. She continued to change her activity (cook for railway workers or for cowboys in ranches or saloons, nurse during a smallpox epidemic at Deadwood in 1878, lingerie in brothels run by her friend Dora DuFran) and traveling from Wyoming, Oregon to California, raising livestock or conveying it. In 1882, she refused to participate in the Buffalo Bill's Wild West.
    She marries a brute, William Steers with whom she has a son Little Calamity who dies infant, then met in 1885 in El Paso Clinton Burke, a Texan with whom she finally wants to land. They married in 1887 and gave birth to a little girl, Jessie. The family then leaves for Colorado, where they open a hotel. Then they still travel from town to town to return to Deadwood, seventeen years after Martha's departure. Her former friends are delighted to see her again; Some want to write his adventures and others propose to play them. Meanwhile her husband leaves her. She was then employed at the Palace Museum in Minneapolis in 1896. She then participated in several shows focusing on the Wild West Shows (1883), which was in vogue at the time. In 1896, she was invited to the Exhibition of Khol & Middelton in Chicago and Minneapolis, which she took advantage to publish her autobiography. In 1901, she was interned in a poor house: a New York journalist came to fetch her at the Pan American Buffalo Exposition, but, alcoholic and unmanageable, she was quickly sent back.
    She died on 1 August 1903 of pneumonia. Two of his friends carry his body from the town of Terry to Deadwood, where members of the Black Hills Pioneer Society organize prestigious funerals. Dressed in white, placed in a padded coffin, his body is exposed in the back room of a saloon where all the inhabitants of Deadwood can come and bid him a last farewell.
    She is buried in Mount Moriah (Deadwood) cemetery, next to Wild Bill Hickok, according to her wishes

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    According to these letters, Jane Hickok Burkhardt McCormick was born in 1873 of Calamity Jane and Wild Bill Hickok (James Butler Hickok). She was entrusted by her mother to a couple of English origin, Jim O'Neil and his wife. Jim O'Neil received the letters of Calamity Jane before his death in 1912, and handed them to Jane Hickok. His birth certificate was inscribed on a page of the Bible
    His name is often quoted as Martha Jane Cannary (or Canary), but the Jane is questionable: she does not attribute this name in his Autobiography, it could be a nickname that appears in the press around 1875 and according to Gregory Monro Could mean that she was a "coach", or, according to James McLaird, this Jane is the female equivalent of Joe, and are both common nickname bases
    A census taken in 1860 in Mercer County, unambiguously indicates the presence of RW Canary, a thirty-five-year-old farmer from Ohio, Charlotte, his wife, twenty, and their three children, Martha, four Year, Cilus, three years and Lana, one year giving 1856 as the year of birth (but not the date)
     
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    Last edited: May 21, 2017

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