And, by the way, the Federal government prolonged slavery

Discussion in 'Education' started by Fraulein Hilda, May 24, 2009.

  1. Fraulein Hilda
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    Fraulein Hilda BANNED

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    By refusing to allow free states to make free men of runaway slaves.
     
  2. Meemer
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    Meemer Member

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    I think you'll find many freedmen in the New England States and in many Mid-Atlantic States prior to the war.
    Many of these people served in the war. They freely chose to do so.
     
  3. Cecilie1200
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    Cecilie1200 Gold Member

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    Um, those are not the same as runaway slaves.
     
  4. Meemer
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    Meemer Member

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    Uh, many became free after being runaways.
    Where did all the free blacks originate in the non-slave states?
    With Emancipation blacks could join the Army and the Navy and they did.
    Perhaps you refer to the sticky point of allowing hunters to find runaways and to return them to their owners in free states.
    This then goes to the dominance of the South in Congress for many decades.
    Once those states left the Union, things changed.

    200,000 blacks served the Union in the Civil War. Weren't they free?
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2009
  5. DamnYankee
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    DamnYankee No Neg Policy

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    excerpt
    Many have assumed that Lincoln came to the Emancipation because he grew in the office. Actually Lincoln had a well thought out plan for emancipation when he arrived in Washington in March 1861 for his innaguration. His plan was a program of gradualism in which the states would be induced to emancipate slaves through a system of compensation to be financed by Fedral bonds. He was willing to accept a gradual emancipation if the states would agree to emancipation as the eventual outcome. Those who would criticze this approach need to remember that under the Constitution, slavery was a state matter and the Federal Government had no Constitutional authority to interfere. This was Lincoln's most important goal for his administration. After the Conderates chose to suceed, he began to persue this approach, focusing on Deleware, the borde state where slavery was the weakest. He met with Deleware politicans and bills were put before both houses of the legislature. [Guelzo, LEP.]
    the American Civil War -- Emancipation
     
  6. Cecilie1200
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    Cecilie1200 Gold Member

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    Many? Really? How many? What's your source of info that "many" freedmen were once runaway slaves?

    Where did all the free blacks originate from? Seriously? Holy God in Heaven, WHAT are they teaching in schools? :eusa_pray: Do you really think that running away was the only way for a slave to become free? Or that there weren't black people who came to the US in the antebellum period who had never been slaves? Shockingly, there WERE lots of non-slave black people in the world, and a few of them DID see the same sort of opportunity in a wide-open new area that white people did.

    The vast majority of free blacks in the antebellum US were freed by their owners, either by provision in the owners' wills when they died, or in the cases of Maryland and Delaware in particular, when the economy of the North changed so much that slave-owning became impractical. And, of course, as each individual state abolished slavery, those slaves became free.

    As for the federal government perpetuating slavery, it wasn't just slave-hunting. Consider, if you will, the Dred Scott decision, which not only put the kibosh on the idea of slaves becoming free simply by being in non-slave states, but also put the freedom of already-free blacks into possible jeopardy, because it stated that blacks could not be citizens.

    I haven't a clue what the rest of your post has to do with anything. The fact remains that the federal government DID perpetuate slavery.
     
  7. Fraulein Hilda
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    Fraulein Hilda BANNED

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    Read up on Bloody Kansas.
     
  8. Cecilie1200
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    Cecilie1200 Gold Member

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    Um, who? And why?
     
  9. Meemer
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    Meemer Member

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    I just discovered my typing error. Over 20,000 blacks (11% of black pop.) fought for the North. Sorry.
     
  10. Kevin_Kennedy
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    Kevin_Kennedy Defend Liberty

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    Actually, Lincoln supported in his first Inaugural Address an amendment to the Constitution to make slavery permanent where it already existed. Some say he even wrote the amendment himself, though I've never seen it confirmed.
     

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