An idea for a new class

Discussion in 'Education' started by Semper Fi, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. Semper Fi
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    Semper Fi VIP Member

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    Academic stuff is good, but is all the different classes so necessary? Not to say that they shouldn't be around, but I think there are some additional classes they may be of benefit.

    For instance, students leaving high school enter the world of financial chaos. Unless they know what to do, they may find themselves in debt in no time, and suffer a lifetime for it. A class on basic finance; bank accounts, mutual funds, basic investing. It could do some good.

    Another idea is basic car mechanics. The first thing that spudders any virtually any given automobile and it ends up in the shop. A lot of this stuff could be taken care of. Maybe combine the class with household mechanics, how to tighten a screw and other common household tasks.

    Just a thought. Im not saying it should be a required course, but right now there's nothing close to that, not even an elective. What do you think?
     
  2. Shattered
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    They got rid of Economics, and Auto Mechanics classes? They were around when I was in school...as electives, as a matter of fact...
     
  3. Semper Fi
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    Semper Fi VIP Member

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    They have economics, but I think that's more of how the economy works and stuff like that, not necessarily financial well-being. I dont know, I havent taken the class. My brother did, I'll have to inquire. And auto-shop, yeah thats a goner. It was around when my brother was a freshman and maybe a sophomore (he had to walk to another building, which is now a separate high school), but not anymore.
     
  4. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    My school had woodshop. Some schools had autoshop.

    Most kids learned auto repair from dad, or friends, or on their own because they had to in order to keep their car running.
    Finance was taught by parents that made you pay your own way for extras (like a car).
    It worked, and it worked well, you got a job and were proud of it.

    I'm afraid those days are gone.
     
  5. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    My kids' high school REQUIRED Consumer Education in junior year. It was right up there with gym credits in the most likely for kids to find themselves short of in senior year, (like gym, they thought 'showing up' would be enough).

    It covered checkbook writing and accounting; credit cards; figuring out interest both APR and the other :duh3: ; budgeting; and establishing/maintaining a credit rating; ta dum, doing a 1040A form. They also covered the basics of economics regarding the national budget, something that SHOULD be taught in civics.
     
  6. Semper Fi
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    Now that makes sense, thats all Im saying is that a class like that should be available. I'm glad to see that it is in some areas--or was.
     
  7. Semper Fi
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    Semper Fi VIP Member

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    I'm afraid as well, sir. It seems like a lot of parents either a. neglect to teach their children about stuff like that, or b. don't know it themselves (look at the percentage of America in debt, and knows dittly squat about fixing cars and householdware).

    However, I admire your sense of tradition and desire to uphold that, as do I. Unfortunatley, i dont see it happening.
     
  8. Nienna
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    That's AWESOME! I have never heard of a class like that even being offered around here. I have been using Mr. P's method with my kids.
     
  9. Nienna
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    Nienna Senior Member

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    Not too far off the topic....

    I would like to start my little girl on an allowance. She will be 10 in May. I have no idea how much to give her. Is $5 a week about right? I put aside the idea of connecting the pay with each job, bc then they started expecting to be paid for EVERY tiny little thing they did. So I was thinking, give a list of jobs/expectations, and a set amount of money. If they neglect their responsibilities they can get their pay docked. Any other ideas, anyone? What did you do with your kids?
     
  10. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    We had a class like that called "Decisions in the Marketplace." Same basic concepts: balancing a checkbook, comparing insurance, buying cars, etc. Good, real world education, required for all seniors to graduate.
     

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