America’s Very Real Trucker Shortage — and What’s Driving It

Discussion in 'Economy' started by longknife, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    Before any of that autonomous driving becomes a reality in the trucking industry we would first have to be able to make things that don`t malfunction. Is there anything you can think of besides a heavy duty sledge hammer or a crow bar that is on the market and is guaranteed never to fail? The aviation business has been trying to achieve that ever since they existed.
    It is not the same thing to design an autonomous drone that can take off and land as opposed to an airliner which can seat several hundred people. For one thing nobody would kick up a big fuzz if a drone cracks up during a cross wind landing and sudden sporadic wind gusts.
    Even though the Airbus or the latest Boeing autopilots could land a plane on a runway no airline would ever allow their pilots to keep texting their wife or girlfriend and leave the controls on auto pilot. The reason being that the carnage is far greater than it is if a drone screwed up.
    Same difference between a heavy transport truck and an autonomous Uber taxi with just 1 or 2 people on board. The math is simple: E=1/2*mv^2. For the mass m you might as well plug in n as the number of people times their average weight and the number of $ the insurance company has to pay after they got injured or killed. If a car could cause the same amount of damage as a heavy truck you would have been paying all along the same high insurance premiums as they are for trucks. AI and automation is vastly over rated. Automated assembly lines are not a big deal. Each station does just simple jobs, like spot welding the same item all day long every day or driving in the same set of screws. Nothing really as complicated as trouble shooting and fixing a vehicle defect would be in comparison. For that you need a human mechanic !
    If something malfunctions on a truck, like say in cold weather you get condensation in your compressor and the airlines it will freeze and your brake system will no longer function.
    Stuff like that happens all the time and truck drivers are expected to fix it. Nobody wants to hire drivers that don`t know how and just sit there till somebody else helps them.
    Especially if he is sitting on a railroad crossing after the spring brakes automatically locked up his wheels when the air-line pressure dropped out.
    Some people say "but robots never take sick leave". Quite true, but what the same people would not know is how may days the mechanic who is supposed to fix the robot had to wait for the replacement parts to get shipped from over-seas. That may take a lot longer than the sick leave people like to take when they have a hang-over.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  2. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    An assembly line job is easily replaced using robotics. But as soon as a job requires ingenuity or imagination you are up shit creek without a paddle with AI and robotics:
     
  3. Manonthestreet
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    Manonthestreet Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    I don't know where you got that figure but it looks ancient
     
  4. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    The Google God...said 2015
     
  5. Manonthestreet
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    Manonthestreet Platinum Member Supporting Member

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    That's less than .30 per mile at 2500 miles per week so they must be including part time drivers cause .30 is an ancient base
     
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  6. AsherN
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    AsherN VIP Member

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    13 hours "On Duty", 12 hours driving. 30 minutes break every 8 hours. Exceptions made for major traffic incidents or weather. Max of 60 hours before a 36 hour reset is required. But hey, don't let facts get in the way.
     
  7. longknife
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    longknife Diamond Member

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    Still, nobody is talking about local drivers.
     
  8. Shrimpbox
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    Shrimpbox Gold Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Thank you polar bear for the wonderful education. What I would like like to point out is that many of the troubles you have so many other industries have, especially when it comes to small independent operators. The state or the federal bureaucracy can and does run roughshod over the little guys, especially when they want to.

    These are some,of,the problems our delivery drivers run into. Huge deliveries with no help. A tv camera monitoring every thing move they make. A huge bias for anything the insurance company wants and no consideration for the driver. You can’t sip a drink, talk on your cell phone, look the wrong way without being punished. You are monitored for how long you spend at each stop. Like polar bears commentary, big companies only look at labor to squeeze out more sacrifices. I say that as a full supporter of capitalism but I tire of companies that determine what profit they want to have and then turn the screws on employees to attain that. That is not every company, but it is too many.
     
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  9. Darkwind
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    Darkwind Gold Member

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    They rarely make 80k either.

    Only OTR drivers who own their own vehicle make any serious money after all the fees and regulations that they have to pay for along with the maintenance of their truck. Even those who drive under their own authority (they do make 250k a year before costs) only bring home maybe 100k a year. That is for 70 hour weeks and home time that is measured in days a year.
     
  10. Darkwind
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    Darkwind Gold Member

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    It's changed. You can now be on duty 14 hours of which, only 11 can be driving.
     

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