Airliners may get missile defenses

Discussion in 'Middle East - General' started by Abbey Normal, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. Abbey Normal
    Offline

    Abbey Normal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    4,825
    Thanks Received:
    391
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Mid-Atlantic region
    Ratings:
    +391
    I think this is a great plan regardless of the cost. One of my biggest terrorist fears is a shoulder fired missile targeting a commercial airliner. I do wonder how they can test these safely?


    Airliners may get missile defenses By Gary Stoller, USA TODAY
    Thu Jul 14, 6:50 AM ET

    The government will begin testing anti-missile equipment on three airliners next month, a first step toward what could be the most expensive security upgrade ever ordered for the nation's aviation system.

    Both Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems will rig out-of-service planes with laser defense systems designed to misdirect shoulder-fired missiles, said John Kubricky, director of the Department of Homeland Security's systems engineering and development office. Test results will be sent to Congress early next year.

    It could take years before passenger planes carry protection against missiles, a weapon terrorists might use to shoot down jets and cause economic havoc in the airline industry. The tests will help the nation's leaders decide if they should install laser systems on all 6,800 aircraft in the U.S. airline fleet at a cost of at least $6 billion.

    "Yes, it will cost money, but it's the same cost as an aircraft entertainment system," Kubricky says...

    Though no plane in the U.S. has ever been attacked, about 35 airliners and other non-military planes have been attacked elsewhere by shoulder-fired missiles since the late 1970s, according to an October 2004 report by the Congressional Research Service. The attacks shot down 24 aircraft and killed 500 people.

    A RAND Corp. study this year recommended postponing installation of anti-missile systems. The study assumed, however, that it would cost $11 billion - not the $6 billion Northrop now cites - to equip all U.S. aircraft with anti-missile technology.

    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=sto...14/ts_usatoday/airlinersmaygetmissiledefenses
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. dmp
    Offline

    dmp Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    13,088
    Thanks Received:
    741
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Enterprise, Alabama
    Ratings:
    +741
    I'm suspect. I'm wondering if such defenses would have time to recognize and defeat a Mach2 Missile launched from less than 3000 meters away.
     

Share This Page