Abortion banned in high-risk pools and insurers start issuing child policies again

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Greenbeard, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    I didn't see any updates to the existing threads on these issues today, so here's a new one.

    Federal rules out today ban abortion coverage in the new high-risk pools:
    More details about the coverage available at that link.

    Meanwhile, guidance released by HHS two days ago is assuaging the concerns of insurers who had halted or threatened to halt the issuing of new policies for children:
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2010
  2. Quantum Windbag
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    Quantum Windbag Gold Member

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    So, rates for healthy people will go up. Nice to see I was right about that all along.
     
  3. auditor0007
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    auditor0007 Gold Member

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    It's interesting that insurance rates will go up for healthy people considering that the high risk pool insurance is no bargain. I have not yet seen the rates for Ohio as it will be run by a private insurance company rather than the federal government. But looking at rates from states run by the federal government, the rates I would be paying are around $500 per month with a $2500 deductible. I am not sure if the deductible must be fully met before coverage kicks in or if doctors visits are covered with a co-pay. Either way, for most, coverage won't kick in before the insuree pays between $8000 to $8500. And then there is still another $3450 that must be paid before the insurance pays 100%. So, for anyone with serious health issues, they will be paying around $14,000 per year.

    In effect, this will exclude a great many people as they just won't be able to afford it. Comparing current rates for a similar plan for a so-called healthy person, the cost is under $200 per month. And a healthy person is not going to pay much if anything in deductibles if they are not sick. So for me, all this whining is about nothing at all. If you're healthy, it's not going to cost you a fortune. I realize that in certain states such as New York, rates are considerably higher. But overall, for most, this is an accurate assessment.

    To be honest, I'm not certain how many people will be able to afford this high risk coverage. I guess only time will tell. The real ramifications will occur once these insurance companies are required to accept everyone at the same rates regardless of pre-existing conditions.
     

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