A Rational Discussion of the Federal Budget

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Conservative, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. Conservative
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    Conservative Type 40

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    excellent look at one aspect of the budget... entitlements like Medicare.

    A Rational Discussion of the Federal Budget | RealClearPolitics

     
  2. g5000
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    g5000 Diamond Member

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    Hmmm, look at that. A half page article with the lofty claim of being "A Rational Discussion of the Federal Budget" that does not utter a syllable about defense spending.

    That's the Democratic spin for Republican plans.

    When a Democrat wants to change anything, then it becomes, according to Republicans, a "government takeover".

    :lol:
    .
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  3. Conservative
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    Conservative Type 40

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    you missed my comments then...

     
  4. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    No question that both Medicare and Social Security need to be fixed. The question is....Do we need a major revamp of both programs or merely a change in the contributions and benefits?

    Republicans seem to be going for the nuclear option in using current insolvency as a justification to privatize both programs. Social Security needs a change in the retirement eligibility date (70 vs 67) to regain solvency.

    Medicare is more difficult. Insurance companies do not want to insure old people. They never have and never will. Old people are the ones who use most of our medical dollar. They are also the ones most afraid of being bankrupted and pennyless after a major illness. Vouchers may work short term. The risk is in vouchers not keeping up with escallating medical costs and leaving the elderly at risk of financial ruin.

    The answer seems to be more in attacking the medical cost aspects of the formula rather than the insurance part
     
  5. Conservative
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    I do not completely disagree with your comments.

    :)
     
  6. Conservative
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    BTW, for what it's worth, I am on record on this board as stating that were I elected President, one of my first objectives would be tpo get a comprehensive list of EVERY military facility, base, etc. we have around the world, and determine if we could reduce or eliminate presence in various areas without affecting the stability of the area or our ability to defend ourselves. I am relatively sure we could drop a minimum of 20% of our defense budget by looking into this.
     
  7. g5000
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    g5000 Diamond Member

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    This is correct. We are living longer and should therefore be working longer. And any reform must have cost reduction as its PRIMARY goal.

    ObamaCare was a classic bait-and-switch con game. Remember all that talk about the per capita spending on medical care in the US? Healthcare "reform" was supposed to be about bending the cost curve down.

    That was the bait.

    The switch was ObamaCare. It does nothing to bend the cost curve down at all. In fact, it entrenches systems which will continue to bend the curve up, and then some.


    .
     
  8. Grampa Murked U
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    Grampa Murked U Diamond Member

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    Rational indeed

    :clap2:
     
  9. NYcarbineer
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    NYcarbineer Diamond Member

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    In 1997, the Trustees of Medicare projected Medicare part A would be insolvent by 2001.

    It wasn't, and as of 2012, it's not.

    Why is that?????

    reference:

    Solvency Projections of the Medicare Part A Trust Fund, 1970-2011 - Kaiser Slides
     
  10. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Insurance is at the core of out Medical care crisis. It adds nothing to overall well being of Americans but only serves as a middle man in pooling premiums and dispersing payments. The overhead and profit margins of the Insurance Industry only add to the growing medical waste.

    Countries with universal coverage have a much lower overhead cost and consume a lower percentage of GDP. We need to do more to hold down medical costs. More competition in treatment options, more competition in the drug industry and lower cost preventive screenings
     

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