A new yet covert iteration of the same old theme!

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Wry Catcher, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. Wry Catcher
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    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

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  2. Oddball
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    Nothing covert about it....You've been overtly pounding the same tired old theme of trying to frame the Tea Party as rednecks and closet racists since day one. :lol:
     
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  3. Barb
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    Barb Carpe Scrotum

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    Offended by the counter culture, fearful of the civil rights groups, and tired of the disruption that culminated in the violence of the 1978 Democratic National Convention, the “Middle America” Richard Nixon appealed to were the “forgotten” Americans that comprised Kevin Phillips “Southern strategy.”

    The people of the “Republican Majority” that Phillips spoke of desired patriotism, quiet, law, order, and an end to what they considered the increasing decadence represented by the counter-culture, the women’s movement, and the new left.
    The Sun Belt was also a natural environment for the exploitation of racial animosities, and Richard Nixon proved to be brilliant at showing that the Republican Party was intent on “protecting white Southern interests.” He appointed his deputy counsel, Harry Dent, to that specific task, and used the Presidential bully pulpit to redefine certain terms in the legally settled argument of desegregation. Established Supreme Court law was now “extreme.” Violation of that law was also “extreme,” but of a softer sort, one that needed mitigation, because if the law itself was extreme, it logically followed that the law was illegitimate. There had to be one more redefinition for this to work. What anyone would logically consider obstruction and abdication of the duty of the President to uphold the law became “the middle way.”

    The second part of the Southern strategy followed in making the Supreme Court itself, illegitimate, and identifying its Justices as Northeastern liberals intent on “[imposing] an alien social philosophy on the land.” Vice President Spiro Agnew furthered this agenda with confrontational and heated rhetoric that clearly identified the politics of polarization as the means of Republican ascendency. President Nixon followed up by keeping his promise to the Southern states by nominating to the Supreme Court conservative, pro-business, and segregationist Jurists. Although two failed the nomination process, even those failures were skillfully successful in solidifying Southern conservative dedication to the Republican Party. Regardless of how his presidency ended, the foundation put in place by President Nixon would prove to be his most enduring legacy to the Republican Party. The Sun Belt would prove crucial to Ronald Reagan and Congressional Republicans when the evangelical Protestants who would make up the “Moral Majority” and the “Religious Right” learned to exert their demographic influence.

    What today's tea party movement has in common with the coalition of the Reagan revolution is the seeming and actual disarray of the movement itself. The Reagen coalition was a loosely bound "collection of resentments," single issue voters who could be targeted by direct mail in an appeal to their most evident resentment, and while the donations coming from this group hardly covered postage and the staff researching preferences and writing the letters, this method of communication by-passed the already sympathetic media and offered no avenue for public rebuttal.

    Reagan was a uniter. What he gathered together is still in evidence today. What that is though, is still the politics of resentment, and populism turned to the memes of corporate servitude.

    The “politics of resentment,” was not new to American political discourse when Ronald Reagan ran for the presidency, but he perfected the use of code words and catchphrases that stirred racial animosity, and economic hostility against the poor gained in social legitimacy during his presidency. The term “welfare queen,” used in speeches during his first run for the Republican nomination against Gerald Ford criminalized poverty, and feminized crime. This served the memes that government was wasteful of hard working peoples’ money, and that the poor were not only undeserving of concern, but also prone to criminal activity. A story about “a woman on Chicago’s South Side,” cheating the system to live in luxury, coupled with tales of a “strapping young buck” paying for his groceries with food stamps drew on the racial hostility that served the continuation and growth of the Republican’s Southern Strategy.
    During his administration, President Reagan further succeeded in redefining the term “special interests” to mean the opposite of what Noam Chomsky and Edward Sherman identify as its more valid description:

    By redefining “special interests” in this way, with the support of the news media, President Reagan brought to the Republican fold a significant number of the working class who, because they did not view either party as representative of their interests, did not bother to vote in the 1980 election. By 1984, in spite of President Reagan’s upward redistribution of wealth under “trickle down” Reaganomics, he managed to convince the majority of the voting public that “he was the ‘equal opportunity’ candidate; a believer in ‘conservative egalitarianism,’ he trumpeted his identification with the average citizen and his opposition to ‘special treatment for blacks.” This was especially appealing to a growing demographic of white men angry about “quotas” and “fairness” at the expense of what they considered a standard of equality.

    Chafe, William H., The Unfinished Journey: America since World War II, 4TH Ed., Oxford University Press, Inc., New York (1999).
    Hamby, Alonzo, L. Liberalism and Its Challengers, 2nd Ed., Oxford University Press, Inc., New York (1992).
    Horton, Scott, Harpers Magazine, “The southern Strategy Comes of Age” retrieved November 20, 2009 from The Southern Strategy Comes of Age?By Scott Horton (Harper's Magazine) (4, November, 2008)
    Sherman, Edward S. and Chomsky, Noam Manufacturing Consent: the political economy of the mass media Pantheon Books, New York, (2002)
     
  4. PLYMCO_PILGRIM
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    PLYMCO_PILGRIM Gold Member

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    Spot on Dude.
     
  5. Wry Catcher
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    Wry Catcher Platinum Member

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    You missed the point (gee, what a surprise). A thoughtful response might have pointed out the differences between today's tea bag movement and the overtly jingoistic racisim of Wallace/Maddox and their supporters.
    Of course I've pounded the Tea Baggers, why not? IMHO TB's are extremists, whose passion is fueled by the same old demogougery which, when reduced to its essence, is nothing more than hate and fear of any idea or person whose beliefs differ from their own. Of course that describes extremists of all stripes, what is unique about the TB movement is its blatant hostility to facts, overt hypocrisy and absence of critical thinking.
     
  6. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    I missed no point at all...Your lack of introspection is bordering upon legendary here, to the point that the irony of each and every one of your Freudian projections doesn't even register.

    But at least your sociopathic behavior is still marginally amusing.
     
  7. Truthmatters
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    Why is is so hard for the tea party leaders to denounce racism?
     
  8. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    Why is it so hard for the moonbat left to talk about virtually anything these days without playing the race card?
     
  9. Claudette
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    Claudette Gold Member

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    YOu got that right.

    Anyone or organization that disagrees with the boy king is a racist.

    MY God. They couldn't possibly disagree with his lefty loon agenda. Perish the thought. That leaves RACISM. Thats what its gotta be. LOL

    Ask Truthmatters, I'm sure she'll agree. LMAO
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  10. Flopper
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    The use of federal power to enforce integration upon the South resulted in southerns feeling that the federal government had no place in interfering with laws and customs of the southern states. Out of this grew a hatred for the federal government that exists today. The issues have changed but the philosophy remains the same. Stop the federal government's intrusion into our lies. Return the power to the states, reducing the size and power of the federal government. This is the underlying theme of the Tea Party just as is was the segregations.

    The states make laws to protect the rights of the majority. The feds make laws to protect the rights of the individual.
     

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