A Dean two step

Discussion in 'Politics' started by MtnBiker, Dec 20, 2003.

  1. MtnBiker
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    MtnBiker Senior Member

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    From Dean's own website:

    Dean Calls for New Social Contract

    Dec. 18, 2003 -- Today in New Hampshire Governor Dean announced a “New Social Contract for Working Families,” tying together his central proposals for health care, education, childcare, tax reform and retirement savings. Dean’s vision addresses the stresses and strains facing working families in a new era, with more women working and more two-worker families facing longer hours to make ends meet.


    Governor Dean’s domestic policy addresses the responsibilities of corporations to American society, calling to end the benefits of offshore tax havens, reform corporate governance and demand a greater accountability for the impact of corporate behavior:

    Howard Dean's Web Site

    Boston Globe
    As governor, Dean signed bill that aided offshore insurers
    By Michael Kranish, Globe Staff, 12/19/2003

    WASHINGTON -- As part of Howard Dean's effort to attract companies to set up so-called "captive" insurance businesses in Vermont, he signed legislation that enabled a Bermuda-based company to establish a Vermont branch, which industry analysts said at the time could provide a tax break for the parent firm.


    Dean has criticized corporations that incorporate in Bermuda for tax reasons. Yesterday, in a speech prepared for delivery in New Hampshire, Dean said, "It's time to look behind the fiction that allows corporations to become citizens of places like Bermuda and avoid paying income taxes on their foreign income."

    In May 1999, Dean signed a bill designed to help self-owned, or "captive," insurance companies that intended to remain offshore. The legislation, for example, allowed an offshore-based captive insurance company to set up a "branch" in Vermont as a way of complying with US labor laws. This occurred when the captive wanted to cover employee benefits, a new form of business for the captives. The branch was not in an actual building, but was an operation run by Vermont-based specialists in the insurance business.



    Link to the rest of the Boston Globe article
     

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