70 years and no vegetation change

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, Aug 7, 2010.

  1. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    It seems that after 70 years there has been no change in vegetation due to "climate change". And this in the Arctic.

    CO2 Science
     
  2. rdean
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    rdean rddean

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    Stay away from nutjob sites.

    There has been a change to the vegetation in Russia. It's on fire.
     
  3. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Interesting how peer reviewed literature that doesn't meet with your pre-concieved notions(not science BTW) is "religious dogma" and the literature that supports the alarmist view (and which the IPCC has had to admit) is not peer reviewed. So what was your silly comment about "faith" there?

    You are the people exhibiting religious fervor, not us.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Ecological Dynamics Across the Arctic Associated with Recent Climate Change -- Post et al. 325 (5946): 1355 -- Science

    Science 11 September 2009:
    Vol. 325. no. 5946, pp. 1355 - 1358
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1173113
    Prev | Table of Contents | Next

    Review
    Ecological Dynamics Across the Arctic Associated with Recent Climate Change
    Eric Post,1,2,* Mads C. Forchhammer,2 M. Syndonia Bret-Harte,3 Terry V. Callaghan,4,5 Torben R. Christensen,6 Bo Elberling,7,8 Anthony D. Fox,9 Olivier Gilg,10,11 David S. Hik,12 Toke T. Høye,9 Rolf A. Ims,13 Erik Jeppesen,14 David R. Klein,3 Jesper Madsen,2 A. David McGuire,15 Søren Rysgaard,16 Daniel E. Schindler,17 Ian Stirling,18 Mikkel P. Tamstorf,2 Nicholas J.C. Tyler,19 Rene van der Wal,20 Jeffrey Welker,21 Philip A. Wookey,22 Niels Martin Schmidt,2 Peter Aastrup2

    At the close of the Fourth International Polar Year, we take stock of the ecological consequences of recent climate change in the Arctic, focusing on effects at population, community, and ecosystem scales. Despite the buffering effect of landscape heterogeneity, Arctic ecosystems and the trophic relationships that structure them have been severely perturbed. These rapid changes may be a bellwether of changes to come at lower latitudes and have the potential to affect ecosystem services related to natural resources, food production, climate regulation, and cultural integrity. We highlight areas of ecological research that deserve priority as the Arctic continues to warm.
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Arctic Report Card - Recent Changes in Vegetation - Van Bogaert, Walker, Jia, Grau, Hallinger, De Dapper, Jonasson, Callaghan

    Recent vegetation dynamics observations across the Arctic show that, in general, shrubs have become more abundant and taller. A study in northern Alaska (Tape et al., 2006) showed that both larger and smaller shrub species have increased in size, abundance and extent over the last 50 years. As well as increasing in size and filling in empty patches, the shrubs were colonizing new areas (Figure 2). Results do vary regionally. For instance, Shvartsman et al. (1999) pointed to a decrease in shrubs along the Pechora River in western Russia (66.1° N, 57.1° E) between 1960 and 1983, a change they attributed to an increase in trees. Preliminary results from Lantz & Henry (unpublished data, Tape et al., 2006) showed a recent expansion of the shrub cover on the Canadian Mackenzie River delta (69.1° N, 135.1° W). In the Northwest Territories (65.1° N, 111.5° W), P. Grogan (personal communication, 2005; Tape et al., 2006) observed an increase in shrubs on floodplains and stream channels, whereas in Labrador (58.1° N, 72.1° W), Payette (2006) found that alder had increased in conjunction with a northward migration of the treeline.
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Access : Climate change: Increasing shrub abundance in the Arctic : Nature

    Climate change: Increasing shrub abundance in the Arctic
    Matthew Sturm1, Charles Racine2 & Kenneth Tape3

    Top of pageAbstractThe warming of the Alaskan Arctic during the past 150 years1 has accelerated over the last three decades2 and is expected to increase vegetation productivity in tundra if shrubs become more abundant3, 4; indeed, this transition may already be under way according to local plot studies5 and remote sensing6. Here we present evidence for a widespread increase in shrub abundance over more than 320 km2 of Arctic landscape during the past 50 years, based on a comparison of historic and modern aerial photographs. This expansion will alter the partitioning of energy in summer7 and the trapping and distribution of snow in winter8, as well as increasing the amount of carbon stored in a region that is believed to be a net source of carbon dioxide9
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    NOAA, Science, and Nature. Real peer reviewed journals. And why should anyone trust what CO2 Science says an article states? After all, we have right on this board people who post articles that they state supports their position, and when you read the article, you find the opposite is the case.
     
  8. uscitizen
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    Wasilla grows more pot than they used to.
     
  9. Old Rocks
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    Has anyone checked out the backyard of the Alaska Loon lately? That could explain a great many things.
     
  10. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Hey old fraud is this the NOAA who's director claims to have a PhD? Only he doesn't? Is that the same one? Or is it the same NOAA that claims one thing in their press releases that are discounted by satellite data? Is that the same NOAA?

    NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - NOAA: Warmest Global Sea-Surface Temperatures for August and Summer

    August 2009 Global Temperature Update: +0.23 deg. C Roy Spencer, Ph. D.
     

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