6 of the 10 richest counties in U.S. are in DC area

Discussion in 'Politics' started by KissMy, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. KissMy
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    KissMy Free Breast Exam

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    6 of the 10 richest counties in U.S. are in the DC area.

    Fat ass government leaches are bleeding this country dry. The Gingrich government shutdown ended when Clinton agreed to submit a CBO-approved balanced budget. That was one of the best thing that ever happened to this country.

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  2. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    But bureaucrats are underpaid. :rolleyes:
     
  3. KissMy
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    The revolving door Bureaucrats are really screwing US along with Lobbyist.
     
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  4. BoycottTheday
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    Youd have to overpay me to drive around the beltway every day.
     
  5. Claudette
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    Claudette Gold Member

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    How many millionairs are serving in Congress again???
     
  6. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    This may not fit in your thread, Kissy, as it is not about pay...
    ...but the topic is closely realted to the Progressive view of government, and the impostition of unelected technocrats who have come to rule the citizenry.

    1. The concept of ‘checks and balances’ is viewed by Progressives as standing in the way of addressing every and any ‘social ill.’ It is of more than passing interesting that Progressives view of government is of the contrary: powers must be centralized in an executive, and the bureaucrats that invest this type of government. “…the agencies comprising the bureaucracy reside within the executive branch of our national government, but their powers transcend the traditional boundaries of executive power to include both legislative and judicial functions, and these powers are often exercised in a manner that is largely independent of presidential control and altogether independent of political control.” The Birth of the Administrative State: Where It Came From and What It Means for Limited Government

    2. Seventy-two years ago, in 1937, at the height of the New Deal, Walter Lippmann, a repentant progressive, noted that:
    “Throughout the world, in the name of progress, men who call themselves communists, socialists, fascists, nationalists, progressives, and even liberals, are unanimous in holding that government with its instruments of coercion must by commanding the people how they shall live, direct the course of civilization and fix the shape of things to come. . . . [T]he premises of authoritarian collectivism have become the working beliefs, the self-evident assumptions, the unquestioned axioms, not only of all the revolutionary regimes, but of nearly every effort which lays claim to being enlightened, humane, and progressive.
    Nearly everywhere the mark of a progressive is that he relies at last upon the increased power of officials to improve the condition of men.

    3. The Progressives envision an ‘Administrative State’ that moves to solve social ills as they develop by expanding through the addition of unelected bureaucrats, czars, commissions and ‘experts,’ a la the European type of government.
    https://www.hillsdale.edu/news/imprimis/digital/rahe/default.asp

    4. [Woodrow] Wilson placed a premium on expertise. Therefore, this new class would be the experts, the people with mastery over all the ‘principles and details’. Educated specialists who were possessed of insight beyond the masses and certainly beyond that of mere politicians.Barack Obama, Woodrow Wilson and the Administrative State

    5. Former NY Senator James Buckley discussed these bureaucrats and their powers:
    a. While the officials in these agencies are generally good people, they become focused on their particular portfolio of duties, that, often, they cannot see the consequences on other parts of society. Put this together with human nature, and one can see bullying, and misuse of power, especially when these individuals are immune to penalty, and supported by free and extensive legal representation: they have sovereign immunity in their positions.

    b. A remedy would be the ability of citizens to sue the federal government to protect their legitimate interests, for damages. While currently unconstitutional, the Congress can waive sovereign immunity

    6. The average federal employee earned $81,258 per year in 2009. The average private-sector worker earned $50,462. When benefits are added, the private-industry worker gets $10,500, while the federal employee gets $42,000- or more! Federal workers earning double their private counterparts - USATODAY.com

    a. The disparity has grown from 66% in 2000, to 101% in 2009. Federal Employees Continue to Prosper | Cato @ Liberty

    b. When you compare job-to-job, which is difficult as job titles are hard to compare, total compensation for federal employees is 50% higher than private sector counterparts. Even considering skill, education, and seniority, it’s still a large disparity. USAToday, op.cit.

    c. “An apples-to-apples comparison shows that the federal pay system gives many federal workers significantly more compensation than they would get in the private sector. The total premium costs taxpayers $40 billion (according to Richwine and Biggs) or $47 billion (Sherk) per year above market rates.” Federal Pay Still Inflated After Accounting for Skills
    [see also http://universityandstate.wordpress...of-us-federal-government-civilian-employees/]
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2011

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