59% of Mexicans see cartels winning war

Discussion in 'Immigration/Illegal Immigration' started by Angelhair, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. Angelhair
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    Angelhair Senior Member

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    MEXICO CITY - Mexicans are in a funk over their president, and a majority of them think that he's losing control of the country, an opinion poll released Tuesday found.

    Six out of 10 Mexicans think that organized crime gangs are getting the upper hand in the war that President Felipe Calderon launched against drug trafficking when he came to office in late 2006, the poll by Demotecnia found.

    The poll may augur a change in the country's approach to its huge drug-trafficking problem when a new administration takes over after elections next year.

    Calderon, 48, is in the fifth and defining year of a six-year presidential term. His National Action Party is struggling to find a suitable candidate for the 2012 presidential elections - Mexico's presidents serve only one term - and Calderon recently suggested that the party should look outside its ranks for a candidate.

    While the army-backed offensive that Calderon launched when he took office has disrupted drug gangs and netted a handful of drug barons, it's coincided with a rising death toll.

    Last year, 15,273 Mexicans were killed, a spike over the 9,600 killed a year earlier. In total, more than 35,000 people have died in drug violence since Calderon took office.

    In a telephone poll of 500 Mexicans conducted Saturday, Demotecnia found that 59 percent of respondents said the country was as bad off or worse off than it was when Calderon took office.

    Asked who's gaining the upper hand in the war against narcotics cartels, 59 percent also said drug traffickers were winning, the Mexico City polling group said.

    In another question, respondents were asked whether Calderon had a firm grip on the reins of the country or matters were falling out of his control. Sixty-seven percent picked the latter option.

    Demotecnia director Maria de las Heras said the poll reflected frustrations over Calderon's policies on organized crime.

    "The drug war has not worked out well, according to the poll," De las Heras said in a telephone interview. "He has put all his political capital into this, and the perception at least, maybe not the reality, is that it is going very badly. The majority of people are not satisfied."

    59% of Mexicans see cartels winning war
     
  2. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    If the millions who are here were sent home to fight for their country, maybe they would have a chance of winning. Cowards tuck their tail and run here. And we want the cowards in our military? If they are no damn good for Mexico they are no damn good for us either. Those 6 out of 10 who thing cartels are winning need to get of their fat asses and fight for their country. Start by getting rid of Calderone and replace him with someone who has the guts to get rid of these thugs. What if Mexico had to fight a real war. Cartels need to be fought on their terms. Fire for fire,etc. Calderone's millitray need to start beheading members of the cartel and castrations. Too bad Mexico don't have fighters like Emiliano Zapato, Francisco Villa
     
  3. LilOlLady
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    LilOlLady Gold Member

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    Corrupt Mexican Army Officer in Calderon’s Inner Circle Supplied Drug Cartels with Weapons

    February 24, 2011
    By Larry Keane

    According to a recently released U.S. diplomatic cable, a Mexican officer assigned to guard President Felipe Calderón had been leaking information to drug cartels in exchange for bribes, training hit men through a private security firm, and supplying military weapons to Mexican drug cartels. This corrupt official was arrested by the Mexican Attorney General in late 2008. The weapons this corrupt official supplied to the cartels were almost certainly of U.S. origin.

    Knowledge that the cartels are obtaining firearms from corrupt military and law enforcement personnel is nothing new. In recent years, more than 150,000 Mexican troops have defected to work for the cartels – taking their U.S. made service-rifles with them. And recently released State Department cables show that large quantities of U.S. government-sold or lawfully exported rifles, machine guns, grenade launchers and explosives, as well as ammunition, have been seized by Mexico’s military and law enforcement during cartel-related raids over the last several years. Though some of the weapons were sold or exported to other countries, many were sold directly to the Mexican government.

    Corrupt Mexican Army Officer in Calderon
     
  4. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Mexican cartels branching into prostitution...
    :eek:
    Study finds 'alarming' human trafficking figures in Mexico's capital
    May 27, 2011 -- Mexico City's human rights commission calls it a "new form of slavery"; The report is released days after authorities rescue 62 victims of a forced-prostitution ring; Victims' rights "remain unprotected," the study says; Researcher: "The authorities are not investigating, nor are they asking witnesses"
     
  5. nitroz
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    nitroz INDEPENDENTly ruthless

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    The cartels ARE winning.
    Send our troops to the border and be ruthless with cartels.
     
  6. Kiki Cannoli
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    Kiki Cannoli Have you met my shadow?

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    General thinking here is that the cartel war is a civil one and needs to be declared as such; properly placed trained armed troops to take a stand. However, the fear is palpable in that it is certain much more innocent blood will be shed. Reasoning is that the cartels are armed with missiles and grenades and automatic weapons much more modern and sophisticated than those of the Mexican armed forces.

    It is also thought that as northern borders closed, these "lost souls" who couldn't cross were easy pickins for the cartel to organize. Thus their strength in numbers grew rapidly and the blood shed more ruthless - these thugs have nothing to lose.

    But make no mistake, this is a culture that does not live in fear. People aren't hiding after dark. The conversations are much more matter of fact rather than desperate - i am certain that Juarez is a different place - I interact frequently with many people from across this vast country and speak from my experiences.

    The vast majority unapologetically see USA drug use and hollywood's glamorization of said use as a major contributing factor to the cartel's continued growth. Surprisingly, more than not, legalization is a recommended course of action.

    ETA: The depiction of Mexican towns being terrorized and innocents being shot are not surprisingly similar to those occurring in the USA where gangs rule areas, drive by shootings occur and new generations are born into dysfunctional environments.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2011
  7. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Kiki wrote: General thinking here is that the cartel war is a civil one...
    :eusa_eh:
    Wrong...

    ... the cartel war is not about civil rights or even states rights...

    ... its about dominance over the drug trade routes...

    ... a civil war is about one right or another...

    ... the cartel war is purely about profit from drug sales - nothing more.
     
  8. Kiki Cannoli
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    Kiki Cannoli Have you met my shadow?

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    I appreciate your response. Allow me to rephrase to say that the situation needs to be treated as a civil war.
     
  9. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    kiki wrote; I appreciate your response. Allow me to rephrase to say that the situation needs to be treated as a civil war.

    That would only legitimize the drug cartels...

    ... i.e. treating them as if they have a just cause...

    ... there is no just cause resulting from dealing dope, human and sex trafficking, etc...

    ... the current stratergy is the correct one.
    :cool:
     
  10. Douger
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    Douger BANNED

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    Your country is based on cowards that were not willing to fix the problems in the places they came from.
    Now it comes on YOU.
    I'm a pussy too. I just had the brains to know that I had no chance fixing it myself.
    I left.
    Just as your ancestors " escaped' to murka, I escaped out of murka.
     

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