5 Myths About Our Land of Opportunity

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Toro, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. Toro
    Offline

    Toro Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Messages:
    50,699
    Thanks Received:
    11,042
    Trophy Points:
    2,030
    Location:
    The Big Bend via Riderville
    Ratings:
    +25,019
    Five Myths About Our Land of Opportunity - Brookings Institution
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  2. JakeStarkey
    Offline

    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    136,821
    Thanks Received:
    12,304
    Trophy Points:
    2,165
    Ratings:
    +32,290
    The first two of these "myths" were true before the Reagan perversion of American ideals beginning in the 1980s.
     
  3. mascale
    Offline

    mascale VIP Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    4,033
    Thanks Received:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    85
    Ratings:
    +453
    Brookings Institution (1), actually pays a Living Wage, or better, to its people, and (2), in (4), has no clue if anything it is showing from its "research" works. "Of course, money is a factor in upward mobility, but it isn't the only one; it may not even be the most important."

    The Reagan Trajectory, in fact, tends to believe in Jelly Beans, and in graduate degrees. Brookings Institution is all for a high school education, especially like in the Washington, D. C. Public Schools at this time(?).

    Brookings Institution has no clue about the Law in the United States. It had no such clue about the Law in Argentina. If anyone looks at the Five Prescriptions, then essentially the reason that the poor have fared so badly is that in fact, "They Brought It On Themselves,' anyone infers.

    Likely, even the pricey schools are reluctant to admit that a lot of these people aren't even Jewish. The best of the Ivy League, in fact, even knows that even Sarah Palin is Perfected: And can see all of America, right there from her front porch(?). There are just too many other things to consider, in America, instead of the computing in the Law.

    Anyone might guess that it helps to have your part of $2.5 tril. in Preservative Bucks for the status quo.

    Money, at Brookings Institution, is nowhere on radar. There is just too much "other" to go around.

    "Crow, James Crow: Shaken, Not Stirred!"
    (Of course Argentine unions indexed all of their wages a fixed percentage. That was a wonderful idea, even Ivy League USA suggested--or whatever Milton Friedman's people were. Anyone already knows about the Ivy League support of it, even now--and even in Oslo.)
     
  4. California Girl
    Offline

    California Girl BANNED

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    50,337
    Thanks Received:
    8,960
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings:
    +8,965
    #5 kinda blows Obama's healthcare claims outta the water. Oops.
     
  5. The Rabbi
    Offline

    The Rabbi Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    67,619
    Thanks Received:
    7,821
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Nashville
    Ratings:
    +18,214
    I would still quibble with #1. Labor laws are so much harsher in Britain than here, and tax rates much higher it makes it more difficult to get ahead.
    I haven't thought through the statistics on it but I suspect there is a flaw in the methodology.
     
  6. editec
    Offline

    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    41,427
    Thanks Received:
    5,598
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +5,617
    The best way to avoid poverty in America is to start out not poor.

    Everything else sort of flows from that.

    You'll start out with a better education leading to a still better post k-12 education, and thanks to your already established superior social status, you'll also have the contacts that give you the heads up about where the better paying billets are, too.
     
  7. rightwinger
    Offline

    rightwinger Paid Messageboard Poster Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    120,215
    Thanks Received:
    19,815
    Trophy Points:
    2,190
    Location:
    NJ & MD
    Ratings:
    +45,305
    From my personal perspective, we don't have the opportunity we once did.

    My father got a job with the phone company when he got out of High School. On a blue collar, linemans salary and with my mother staying home, he raised four kids, owned a three bedroom house on an acre of land, sent four kids to college and retired at 60 with no debt.

    I was able to go to college and pay for most of it working minimum wage jobs ($2 an hour). After college, I was able to support myself on a $6 an hour job. I moved out of the house at 21, got an apartment, bought a car. But my standard of living, even with my wife working and only two kids is not much better than my father enjoyed.

    My kids are 22 and 25 and work full time and live at home. College costs $30,000 a year and there is no way to afford that earning minimum wage. Buying a house costs $300,000 and they are a long way from affording that. College graduates come out with massive debt and poor job prospects. Even with two salaries, it takes a long time to get on your feet.
     
  8. The Rabbi
    Offline

    The Rabbi Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    67,619
    Thanks Received:
    7,821
    Trophy Points:
    1,840
    Location:
    Nashville
    Ratings:
    +18,214
    But compare your father's experience, c. 1940s I would guess, with his own father's or grandfather's, c.1900 or earlier.
    Most people prior to 1900 were farmers. It is miserable work with long hours and low pay. There werent that many opportunities to get away from that life. And where they were, they involved working in dingy factories.
    The nature of work has changed dramatically in this country.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  9. eagleseven
    Offline

    eagleseven Quod Erat Demonstrandum

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    6,518
    Thanks Received:
    1,254
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    OH
    Ratings:
    +1,255
    I am convinced that comparisons to the 1950-1975 period are invalid because that period was exceptional in that the US remained the only country not devastated by WWII.

    1950-1976 American blue-collar prosperity was unsustainable because it was built upon the ruins of Europe and Asia. To compare apples to apples, we must compare current times to the pre-war era, when the US had many competitors.

    Prior to WWI, the American middle class would be considered impoverished by today's standards.
     
  10. PoliticalChic
    Offline

    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    55,686
    Thanks Received:
    15,586
    Trophy Points:
    2,190
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Ratings:
    +24,817
    First-
    As a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, Brookings describes itself as independent and non-partisan. The New York Times has referred to the organization as liberal, liberal-centrist, centrist, and conservative.[15][16][17][18][19][20][21] The Washington Post sometimes describes Brookings as liberal but usually does not characterize the institution and has quoted both Republican and Democratic scholars.[22][23][24] The Los Angeles Times described Brookings as liberal-leaning and centrist before concluding these labels made no sense.[25][26][27][28] In 1977, Time Magazine described them as the "nation's pre-eminent liberal think tank."[29] The organization is described as centrist by the progressive media watchdog group Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting.[12][30][31][32]

    Brookings Institution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Second-
    “I lived for about a decade, on and off, in France and later moved to the United States. Nobody in their right mind would give up the manifold sensual, aesthetic and gastronomic pleasures offered by French savoir-vivre for the unrelenting battlefield of American ambition were it not for one thing: possibility.
    You know possibility when you breathe it. For an immigrant, it lies in the ease of American identity and the boundlessness of American horizons after the narrower confines of European nationhood and the stifling attentions of the European nanny state, which has often made it more attractive not to work than to work. High French unemployment was never much of a mystery.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/04/opinion/04iht-edcohen.2.20587034.html


    Third-
    .When Haitian refugees flee their island, do they aim for Cuba (53 miles), Turks and Caicos (110 miles), Jamaica (124 miles), the Cayman Islands ( 440 miles), or Florida (523 miles ) ? Why is that?
    I guess America is their first stop on the way to Enland.

    I like #4: conservative values.

    #5? Get real, Federal programs never die.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1

Share This Page