5 major disasters (not Yellowstone or Long Valley) always about to do the US:

Discussion in 'Environment' started by bobgnote, Jul 11, 2012.

  1. bobgnote
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    bobgnote BANNED

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    5 Natural Disasters Headed for the United States

    40-Mile-Long Mudslide, Washington State
    Movin' Mountain, Mt.Ranier

    On an overcast afternoon high on Mount Rainier, a rocky slope slumps and then cuts loose from the mountain. Small rock slides are common on the volcano's steep flanks, but this one is different. Most of Mount Rainier's west face is in motion. Into the tumbling maelstrom go millions of tons of ice from the Puyallup and Tahoma glaciers. House-size rocks disintegrate in the downward crush. “With Rainier's active hydrothermal system saturating the rock, the landslide would reach the base of the slope as a flowing mass of watery, muddy debris,” says Kevin Scott, scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO).

    So a lahar is born--a volcanic mudflow--and a nightmare realized for the approximately 150,000 Washington residents who live and work on the solidified debris of past flows. The mass of roiling mud, rock and trees, traveling at 60 mph, would quickly funnel into the canyons of the Puyallup and Carbon rivers, where it would rise 180 ft. high before spreading into the lowlands as a 15-ft. wave.

    The USGS gives a 1-in-7 chance of a similar event occurring in anyone's lifetime. And, says Dan Dzurisin, a CVO geologist: “There's no guarantee there would be any advance warning.”


    80-Ft.-High Tsunami, Atlantic Coast
    Coast Buster

    Cumbre Vieja, the most active volcano in the Canary Islands, lurches as a violent earthquake wracks its upper slopes. A third of the mountain breaks away and plunges into the Atlantic Ocean, pushing up a dome of water nearly 3000 ft. high. They don't yet know it, but tens of millions of Americans from Key West, Fla., to South Lubec, Maine, have just 9 hours to escape with their lives.

    The collapse of Cumbre Vieja unleashes a train of enormous waves traveling at jetliner speed. The first slam into nearby islands, then the African mainland. By the time they reach the East Coast of North America, the waves are up to 80 ft. high, and in low-lying areas, sweep several miles inland.

    When tsunamis strike the United States, it is usually Hawaii or Alaska that take the hit. But topography and population density put the East Coast in a special risk category. “More Easterners are exposed to potential tsunamis--from the Canary Islands or the Cape Verde Islands--than the people on the West Coast, which has a steep coastline and few lowlands,” says Steven Ward, a geophysicist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. A Cumbre Vieja eruption in 1949 opened a mile-long, 20-ft.-deep fissure near the crest, forcing the volcano's western face to slump several feet. A 1971 eruption didn't budge it.

    Marine geologists at Southampton Oceanography Center in Great Britain have a different take. They conclude the volcano would collapse in stages-- at worst threatening nearby islands. Ward calculates only a 5 percent chance Cumbre Vieja will trigger a tsunami in a given century, but that when it does a chunk of earth 15 miles long, 9 miles wide and nearly 1 mile thick will plunge into the sea--a landslide 250 times larger than the collapse of Mount St. Helens.


    [​IMG]
    The tsunami's probable trajectory within 5 hours of the collapse of Cumbre Vieja.

    [​IMG]
    The tsunami's potential range of destruction 9 hours after the collapse of Cumbre Vieja



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    This last event is happening, already, to cause aggravated sea level rise, between Cape Hatteras and Boston. Next?
     
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    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 27, 2012
  2. Intense
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    Intense Senior Member

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    A reminder to be thankful and take nothing for granted.
     
  3. hjmick
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    hjmick Gold Member

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    Ain't nature grand?
     
  4. Dot Com
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    Dot Com Nullius in verba Supporting Member

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    nature can dish out a handful & then some, yes she can. Go down to Miami and say "Andrew" & people still get chills.
     
  5. hjmick
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    hjmick Gold Member

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    You should have been around for the Northridge quake. Talk about a kick in the pants...
     
  6. Intense
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    Intense Senior Member

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    10/17/89 Santa Cruz Quake, was very tough on me and mine. Looped St Helens back in Sept 80, during a minor eruption. Did not get anywhere close though. The fallout was a bitch.
     
  7. skookerasbil
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    skookerasbil Gold Member

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    Now THIS to me is seriously scary stuff to get a bit anxious about...............espsically since Im a stone's throw from the ocean here on Long Island, so Im basically fucked because there is not way to get out of this place except via a couple of bridges.
     
  8. bobgnote
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    bobgnote BANNED

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    It has been known for awhile, how high tides may affect magma chambers, to cause volcanoes to erupt:

    Tidal Lunacy

    More than 25 years ago, a pair of earth scientists compared the records for 680 eruptions that occurred since 1900 and found that "the probability of an eruption is greatest at times of maximum tidal amplitude." In plainer language, volcanoes are more likely to erupt at the fortnightly (or 14-day) "high" tide.

    A specific look at 52 Hawaiian eruptions since January 1832 shows the same sort of pattern. "Nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum." HVO scientists have noted that the Pu'u 'O'o fountaining episodes each occurred remarkably close to fortnightly tidal maximums and that the first set of eruption pauses in 1990 (periods where the eruption turned off for up to a few days) occurred remarkably close to fortnightly tidal minimums.

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    If you want to check out tides:

    http://www.bim-icet.org/

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    CVO Website - Learn About Volcanoes

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    HVO Volcano Watch

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    Cumbre Vieja is NOT on the list of volcanoes, in the Cascades or in Hawaii, which the USGS monitors, to forward data, to their websites.

    I wonder why the fuck not? CV is going to pop the East Coast, Greenland, Brazil, the Caribbean, etc. So why not get out the word, on what is coming, from the Canary Islands?

    CV will be the worst fuckover, before Yellowstone blows.

    The Long Valley eruption will be nasty, but it will only be a zit, compared to CV or Yellowstone. If Yosemite goes off, AND a lot of rain falls on Sacto, the KJ and his crowd in Sacto might notice.

    One more disaster, coming: one fine La Nina, too much rain will fall, in the Sacramento area and in the Sierras, and the levees holding back Sacramento Delta and river water will fail, since they are complete crap, made by farmers, since the turn of the 19th to the 20th Century.

    When that hard rain falls, and those levees fail, the Kings will be a swim-team.
     
  9. bobgnote
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    bobgnote BANNED

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    Even WORSE, an El Nino wet can really raid Sacto. But downtown Sacto has been flooded, by a La Nina event. Now that those levees are old, we are one earthquake and one hard rain away, from complete and total ruin, in Central California.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    And then you have the inevitable 9 to 9.5 quake on the subduction zone that is below Northern California, Oregon, Washington, and Vancouver Island. It will be a very interesting quake. Will it give way all at once, or do an enechelone series, maybe starting at the southern end. That quake will damage or destroy virtually every bridge and overpass from Cape Mendicino to Vancouver Island. It will create tsunamis in some places with a runup as high as 500 ft.

    If it happens in my lifetime, I hope I have retired to Eastern Oregon by that time.
     

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