1quarter: 11.7%, 2nd quarter: 10.3 %

Discussion in 'Economy' started by ekrem, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. ekrem
    Offline

    ekrem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,243
    Thanks Received:
    370
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +375
  2. ekrem
    Offline

    ekrem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,243
    Thanks Received:
    370
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +375
    UK Prime Minister Davod Cameron asks some questions:
    "Which country will be 2nd fastet growing economy in world by 2017?"

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0tIFfGSOyk]YouTube - Cameron wants more trade with Turkey[/ame]
     
  3. uscitizen
    Offline

    uscitizen Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    45,941
    Thanks Received:
    4,791
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    My Shack
    Ratings:
    +4,807
    Turkeys never could keep books.
     
  4. ekrem
    Offline

    ekrem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,243
    Thanks Received:
    370
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +375
    72 Million people, 50% under age 28.
    OECD economic outlook issue No.81: Fastest growing OECD country between 2011-2017.
    UK Prime MInister David Cameron: 2nd fastest growing econmy by 2017 in world.
    430.000 Students graduate from University each year.
    Foreign trade increase between 2003-2008: 186 %
    Exports to neighbouring countries between 2003-2008: 278 %
    Exorts growth to world between 2003-2008: 179 %
    2nd largest construction industry in world.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r87yZud4Z64]YouTube - Turkish Economy Türkische Wirtschaft Türkiye Ekonomisi 2010[/ame]



    UK Trade and Investment Agency
    Istanbul's economy larger then 12 EU countries
    4.8 Billion € pre-accession funding by EU in 2011
    Largest TV producer in Europe
    Largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles
    8% of all internationally traded crude Oil passes through Turkey
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN3Dv-I0GyU]YouTube - Die Türkische Wirtschaft - Besser als man denkt!!! HD.flv[/ame]
     
  5. boedicca
    Offline

    boedicca Uppity Water Nymph Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    41,838
    Thanks Received:
    12,787
    Trophy Points:
    2,250
    Location:
    The Land of Funk
    Ratings:
    +22,866
    This is real. Capital which is fleeing the U.S. and other major economies facing sovereign debt crises - and flowing into high growth, high birth rate ones.

    Turkey is the leader in a 17 country economic region, with strong imports into its sphere. The population reach is significant in a developing world, increasing productivity sense.

    Growth matters - they understand this. Obama doesn't.
     
  6. ekrem
    Offline

    ekrem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,243
    Thanks Received:
    370
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +375
    Except trying to be funny, you only adulate on achievements by the generation before you. Looking at current America, it becomes each day even more visible what great Americans inhabited once those lands, accumulateing wealth that even suffices for the non-productive follow-up generation.
    Something went considerably wrong, maybe you should think about it, whilst you take new debt just for serving interests of existing debt, which is increasingly credited by non-Americans.

    Just who owns the U.S. national debt? - Business - Answer Desk - msnbc.com
     
  7. loosecannon
    Offline

    loosecannon Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    4,888
    Thanks Received:
    263
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +264
    or perhaps more importantly into low wage regions, i.e. underdeveloped nations with low median age. And few regulatory hurdles.

    Globalization is eating the developed nations alive.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2010
  8. loosecannon
    Offline

    loosecannon Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    4,888
    Thanks Received:
    263
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Ratings:
    +264
    I love it when you speak Yoda!
     
  9. Baruch Menachem
    Offline

    Baruch Menachem '

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    14,204
    Thanks Received:
    3,235
    Trophy Points:
    185
    Ratings:
    +3,305
    It might, just for giggles, be fun to compare this record with that of Greece over the last year.
     
  10. ekrem
    Offline

    ekrem VIP Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,243
    Thanks Received:
    370
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +375
    Most of the countries that attracted FDI just for cheap manufacturing and re-export to origin of FDI investor, have become itself important consumer markets.
    Producing at home in an advanced economy, selling worldwide only works if you do produce cutting-edge products which justify the labour-costs. An example would be Germany's automotive and machine building industry. "Made in Germany" is a trademark when it comes to engineering.
    If you do not produce cutting-edge products, you are destined to fail to sell your products at these costs.

    There is also the possibility, that you do not produce cutting-edge products, but still the production involves technology which other countries do not have. In this case, you can also sell your products to the world, which were produced locally. But "2nd and 3rd" world will catch up with technology advancement.

    I think the second paragraph is the main reason, why many of the advanced economies have problems. The problem most of the advanced economies also have is, that they are not in geographical proximity to these major emerging consumer markets.

    FDI to Turkey is mostly portfolio transactions, especially in banking sector. There were major transactions in banking sector the last years, with foreign banks trying to gain a foot within Turkey (young population, new mortgage law and very low household-debts).
    According to Merryl Lynch, household debt in Turkey is only 13% of GDP.
    Also, most Turks only take bank credits in national currency. So foreign banks wanting to profit from Turkish households anyway would have to exchange currencies.
    (from IMF)
    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page