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More Mexican Promises For A Safer Border.

This is a discussion on More Mexican Promises For A Safer Border. within the Politics forums, part of the US Discussion category; US, Mexico commission meets on border violence By The Associated Press Published: December 16, 2010 at 8:42 am A joint U.S.-Mexico committee met for the ...


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Old 01-23-2011, 04:18 AM
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More Mexican Promises For A Safer Border.

Quote:
US, Mexico commission meets on border violence

By The Associated Press
Published: December 16, 2010 at 8:42 am

A joint U.S.-Mexico committee met for the first time Wednesday to address border management issues and border violence.

The committee was created By Presidents Barack Obama and Felipe Calderon in May.

Mexico has expressed concern about the deaths of migrants during recent incidents involving U.S. Border Patrol officers, and the two countries agreed on the need to “minimize the need for United States and Mexican federal law enforcement officers to resort to lethal force.”

They also agreed on “patrolling on either side of the border … to prevent and adequately respond to crime and violence, including incidents of rock-throwing, incursions, port runners, (and) assaults on law enforcement personnel.”

U.S. authorities say they sometimes are assaulted by migrant and drug traffickers and must defend themselves.

A joint declaration by the executive steering committee noted that “recent incidents along our common border underscore the urgency with which the United States and Mexico need to take decisive actions to avoid the recurrence of such events.”

It said those incidents involved loss of life, but did not say whether they involved the shooting of migrants or drug violence.

Mexico was angered in June, when a Border Patrol agent fatally shot a 15-year-old Mexican youth as officers came under a barrage of big stones while trying to detain illegal immigrants on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande.
In May, Mexican migrant Anastasio Hernandez, 32, died after a Customs and Border Protection officer shocked him with a stun gun at the San Ysidro border crossing that separates San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico. The San Diego medical examiner’s office ruled that death a homicide.

And on Wednesday, a Border Patrol agent in Arizona was fatally shot near the border amid a shootout with bandits known for targeting illegal immigrants along a violent smuggling corridor in the desert.

The committee endorsed expanding coordinated patrols and “expanding existing exchanges of passenger information to detect and detain possible drug and weapons smugglers, and other criminals that travel between the U.S. and Mexico.”

The statement also pledged support for various projects aimed at improving ports-of-entry and border crossings in several states, and “expand trusted traveler and shipment programs by facilitating enrollment and making them more advantageous and easy to use.” It also supported the establishment of pilot projects for cargo pre-clearance in both countries.

The issue of migrants and how they are treated remains a sensitive subject in Mexico, even as their overall number of migrants moving across the border drops.

The number of Mexicans deported or repatriated by the United States dropped 23.2 percent in the first 10 months of 2010 as compared to the same period of the previous year, Mexico’s Interior department reported Wednesday.

A total of 410,442 people were returned to Mexico.

Of those, 23,359 agreed to be flown to Mexico City and transported to their hometowns, rather than simply being expelled over the border. That annual program was in effect from June 1 to Sept. 28.

The mayors and governors in some Mexican border states have complained in the past about crime and unemployment problems created by the deportation of large numbers of migrants to border communities.
The number of women repatriated dropped even more steeply, by 34 percent to 44,356 in the first 10 months of 2010.

Arizona Capitol Times Blog Archive US, Mexico commission meets on border violence
Now read the lies that Mexican Presidents have layed on the American people as far back as the Eisenhower administration.

http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/bbf/...tialVisits.pdf


The word "migrant" pops up over and over. Promises, promises,promises......! "Mexico will do something.........!"

A migrant is a tourist who doesn't pay his share of the bill. A terrorist is one who steals from the American people by using the word "migrant" as his disguise.

Last edited by FifthColumn; 01-23-2011 at 04:20 AM.
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Old 02-09-2011, 06:48 PM
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Co-operating to counter the cartels and coyotes...
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U.S., Mexico police unite to fight border crime
Feb. 9, 2011 - Top Homeland Security officials said Tuesday that a little-known coalition of U.S. and Mexican police agencies has played a major part in cracking down on smuggling and illegal immigration along the Arizona-Mexico border.
Quote:
The joint operation between the U.S. Border Patrol, Mexican federal police and about 60 U.S. state, federal, tribal and local police agencies has had a dramatic success in making drug seizures and arresting undocumented immigrants, said Alan Bersin, director of Customs and Border Protection. Since the Alliance to Combat Transnational Threats launched quietly in September 2009 with coordinated training, intelligence-sharing and patrols, the program has resulted in the arrest of 270,000 illegal border crossers, the seizure of 1.6 million pounds of marijuana and the recovery of $13 million in cash in the border's Tucson Sector.

Authorities said that as the program continues, it will be another factor in the efforts to help stem the flow of illegal immigrants and drug smugglers into Arizona. This became a funnel point when officials clamped down in other states along the U.S. boundary with Mexico. "We will force the smuggling organizations out of their entrenched positions here in Arizona . . . north of the border and south of the border, with the help of Mexican law enforcement," Bersin said.

Collaboration among U.S. police agencies near the border is hardly new. Numerous joint operations, such as the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area coalition, have long worked to combat smuggling, money laundering and other border crimes. But Bersin said the alliance is unique because it includes cooperative policing from the Mexican side. In theory, that means smugglers will find it more difficult to evade capture by dodging back across the border when they are detected. The alliance issues weekly intelligence briefings on security threats for all border agencies.

President Barack Obama and Mexican President Felipe Calderón reached an agreement last year to share responsibility to fight smuggling cartels on the border. "No longer would there be a pointing of fingers," Bersin said. "Rather, drugs going north and guns going south would be seen as part of the same vicious cycle. What's really different is how we do business, and how we organize ourselves," said Matthew Allen, Arizona director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "Our efforts (now) extend deep into Mexico."

Read more: U.S., Mexico police unite to fight border crime
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